Celebrating our 9th birthday!

 


We are celebrating 9 years in Louisa Fleet Recruitment!

Yesterday Louisa Fleet Recruitment Consultancy Ltd celebrated our 9th Birthday (socially distanced of course!)
I have to say it's fantastic having 2 bakers in the ! Thank you Pam Christopher and Courteney Drane for the beautiful cakes they were yummy. 
The journey so far has been amazing and looking back we have achieved success we would never have imagined possible
In the past year we are fortunate to have moved into lovely spacious offices and to have expanded our team.

Exciting news for us includes:

  • Our International offering in Dubai and US
  • Our Executive Search and Selection services
  • Expansion into the SAAS and Cyber Security sectors
  • This amazing group continues to grow as does my Fast Forward Show which I love doing, and if you haven't been interviewed yet - please step forward, we are looking for more stories to tell.


Thank you to everyone who has supported our journey and if you have yet to meet us, get in touch!

For more advice or help with your hiring needs:
info@louisafleet.co.uk | 01189 680831 | www.louisafleet.co.uk
LinkedIn | YouTube | Facebook | Twitter

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Are you recruiting globally yet?






Did you know that Louisa Fleet Recruitment are now recruiting internationally?

In the last 12 months, client demands have focussed our attention to Dubai and US recruitment markets, where are experiencing high levels of success in finding top talent. If you have yet to explore the global talent pool, read on and find out why you should!

If the pandemic has taught us anything it’s that whatever was the ‘normal’ way of doing things – isn’t necessarily the right way and change can, should and will come!

Remote or hybrid working appears to be the new working model for many of the big corporates, so why wouldn’t you look into all the possibilities available out there and hire internationally?

To give background to this, the recruitment market is no longer restricted to say, the UK – instead it’s global. Thus, enabling professional recruiters and business owners to expand their potential growth as a brand and a business, as well as introducing a more diverse and dynamic culture.

5 Key benefits to recruiting globally:

1. Expanded talent pool

Search into rich diverse locations where talent is looking for new opportunities to work in new environments. Often experienced in a unique skill which may be lacking in your current organisation.

2. Employee Engagement

Talent from a wider search pool are thought of as being more engaged, and if they are looking to relocate for work, can provide a quick solution with all kinds of new opportunities coming forward.

3. Diverse Workplace and Culture

It is well known and documented that having a diverse team is good for business. Hiring globally can bring about change in perspective keep employees engaged, improving company culture and organisational health as well as the bottom line.

4. Extended working hours

International working can cover different working hours should they remain in situ and remote working. Enabling your business to cover multiple time zones as an extra bonus to your offering. If you are looking to extend your international client base, hiring globally is a smart move.

5. Global Branding

Recruiting globally gives you a way to build your brand in various countries. This can be a marketing tool to increase awareness of your brand in those countries.

Internationally recruited staff can give candid feedback on your product or services to help you gain improved positioning in the marketplace.

If you haven’t explored global recruitment to find your senior sales appointments yet, we are expertly placed to support you and provide a range of client service offerings to help you find the right quality candidates for the role, including:

· Unique LF13 candidate delivery selection and process

· Dedicated recruitment sector specialist managing searches

· 3 Service Offerings, Contingent, Professional and Executive

If you are recruiting or looking for a job in Senior Sales Appointments - no matter where! - please get in touch sales@louisafleet.co.uk to discuss how we can help you.






Did you know that Louisa Fleet Recruitment are now recruiting internationally?

In the last 12 months, client demands have focussed our attention to Dubai and US recruitment markets, where are experiencing high levels of success in finding top talent. If you have yet to explore the global talent pool, read on and find out why you should!

If the pandemic has taught us anything it’s that whatever was the ‘normal’ way of doing things – isn’t necessarily the right way and change can, should and will come!

Remote or hybrid working appears to be the new working model for many of the big corporates, so why wouldn’t you look into all the possibilities available out there and hire internationally?

To give background to this, the recruitment market is no longer restricted to say, the UK – instead it’s global. Thus, enabling professional recruiters and business owners to expand their potential growth as a brand and a business, as well as introducing a more diverse and dynamic culture.

5 Key benefits to recruiting globally:

1. Expanded talent pool

Search into rich diverse locations where talent is looking for new opportunities to work in new environments. Often experienced in a unique skill which may be lacking in your current organisation.

2. Employee Engagement

Talent from a wider search pool are thought of as being more engaged, and if they are looking to relocate for work, can provide a quick solution with all kinds of new opportunities coming forward.

3. Diverse Workplace and Culture

It is well known and documented that having a diverse team is good for business. Hiring globally can bring about change in perspective keep employees engaged, improving company culture and organisational health as well as the bottom line.

4. Extended working hours

International working can cover different working hours should they remain in situ and remote working. Enabling your business to cover multiple time zones as an extra bonus to your offering. If you are looking to extend your international client base, hiring globally is a smart move.

5. Global Branding

Recruiting globally gives you a way to build your brand in various countries. This can be a marketing tool to increase awareness of your brand in those countries.

Internationally recruited staff can give candid feedback on your product or services to help you gain improved positioning in the marketplace.

If you haven’t explored global recruitment to find your senior sales appointments yet, we are expertly placed to support you and provide a range of client service offerings to help you find the right quality candidates for the role, including:

· Unique LF13 candidate delivery selection and process

· Dedicated recruitment sector specialist managing searches

· 3 Service Offerings, Contingent, Professional and Executive

If you are recruiting or looking for a job in Senior Sales Appointments - no matter where! - please get in touch sales@louisafleet.co.uk to discuss how we can help you.

Read More »

Five Ways To Prevent Burnout





As a Sales Leader, chances are your job is hard and stressful at least most of the time. Pouring your mental and physical resources into the tasks at hand day after day can leave you feeling depleted and ready for a break. And if these feelings reach extreme levels — that is, if you experience constant fatigue and apathy — you may be a victim of occupational burnout.

Combating burnout is essential for professionals in high-stress and high-stakes jobs. Not only can burnout kill your productivity and lead to you hating your job (even if you know that you love it), but it can also have a negative impact on your well-being. Fortunately, you can take practical steps to avoid burnout, and if you’re already experiencing it, you can turn things around

Take Breaks

One of the quickest ways to prevent or stop occupational burnout is to take a vacation. Whether you have paid or unpaid vacation time at your job, getting away from work can prove invaluable. Even if leaving your home isn’t an option, a good staycation can do the trick. Taking a break applies to your regular workday as well. Stepping away from work during the day can improve your energy and focus and actually increase productivity.

Follow a Good Diet and Fitness Routine

Practicing self-care can make a big difference in your fight against burnout. Make sure you’re eating a balanced diet with plenty of fruits, vegetables, lean proteins, and healthy fats. Also, find an exercise routine that you enjoy, and then do it at least five days a week. Many professionals find morning routines to work best because you have more energy throughout the day and are more tired when it’s time to turn in for the night. 

Sleep Enough

Speaking of sleep, be sure to get plenty of it. It may feel like you’re wasting time, but allowing your mind and body to recover and regenerate each night is paramount for your productivity and well-being. It’s recommended that adults get between six and nine hours of sleep each night.

Meditate Every Day

Meditation, particularly mindful meditation, comes with a plethora of health benefits. Practicing it a little each day — even if it’s just for 10 minutes — can significantly reduce stress, strengthen focus, minimize negative emotions, and maximize positive emotions. Moreover, self-reflecting during meditation can benefit your relationships and reinforce a healthy life perspective. To keep yourself focused on meditation, make sure your home is a calming space that’s free of anxiety and negativity. Simply decluttering, cleaning, and opening some windows can improve concentration and reduce stress. 

Unplug for Stretches of Time

All sales leaders need to use technology in many ways. And you probably use technology quite a bit outside of work. As amazing as technology is, it’s not exactly great for our attention spans, which is why it can be helpful to take a break from it every once in a while. For instance, consider spending a weekend (or longer) where you unplug from all forms of technology and focus on things like exercising or connecting with family or friends. Don’t be surprised if you come back to work refreshed and able to concentrate for longer periods of time.

Anyone can experience occupational burnout; it doesn’t matter how much you love your job. Start taking advantage of vacation time, and make sure you’re eating well, exercising, and getting enough sleep. Try mindful meditation, and disconnect from technology every now and then to reset your mind and regain perspective. Implementing simple habits like these in your work and home life can help you to stay happy and productive for many years to come.

For help or advice, from recruitment through to finding your next dream job, please reach out to Louisa Fleet Recruitment at louisa@louisafleet.co.uk or 01189 680831!

This article has been written by our guest blogger Julie Morris - Life & Career Coach you can find out more about Julie's services here http://juliemorris.org/ 





As a Sales Leader, chances are your job is hard and stressful at least most of the time. Pouring your mental and physical resources into the tasks at hand day after day can leave you feeling depleted and ready for a break. And if these feelings reach extreme levels — that is, if you experience constant fatigue and apathy — you may be a victim of occupational burnout.

Combating burnout is essential for professionals in high-stress and high-stakes jobs. Not only can burnout kill your productivity and lead to you hating your job (even if you know that you love it), but it can also have a negative impact on your well-being. Fortunately, you can take practical steps to avoid burnout, and if you’re already experiencing it, you can turn things around

Take Breaks

One of the quickest ways to prevent or stop occupational burnout is to take a vacation. Whether you have paid or unpaid vacation time at your job, getting away from work can prove invaluable. Even if leaving your home isn’t an option, a good staycation can do the trick. Taking a break applies to your regular workday as well. Stepping away from work during the day can improve your energy and focus and actually increase productivity.

Follow a Good Diet and Fitness Routine

Practicing self-care can make a big difference in your fight against burnout. Make sure you’re eating a balanced diet with plenty of fruits, vegetables, lean proteins, and healthy fats. Also, find an exercise routine that you enjoy, and then do it at least five days a week. Many professionals find morning routines to work best because you have more energy throughout the day and are more tired when it’s time to turn in for the night. 

Sleep Enough

Speaking of sleep, be sure to get plenty of it. It may feel like you’re wasting time, but allowing your mind and body to recover and regenerate each night is paramount for your productivity and well-being. It’s recommended that adults get between six and nine hours of sleep each night.

Meditate Every Day

Meditation, particularly mindful meditation, comes with a plethora of health benefits. Practicing it a little each day — even if it’s just for 10 minutes — can significantly reduce stress, strengthen focus, minimize negative emotions, and maximize positive emotions. Moreover, self-reflecting during meditation can benefit your relationships and reinforce a healthy life perspective. To keep yourself focused on meditation, make sure your home is a calming space that’s free of anxiety and negativity. Simply decluttering, cleaning, and opening some windows can improve concentration and reduce stress. 

Unplug for Stretches of Time

All sales leaders need to use technology in many ways. And you probably use technology quite a bit outside of work. As amazing as technology is, it’s not exactly great for our attention spans, which is why it can be helpful to take a break from it every once in a while. For instance, consider spending a weekend (or longer) where you unplug from all forms of technology and focus on things like exercising or connecting with family or friends. Don’t be surprised if you come back to work refreshed and able to concentrate for longer periods of time.

Anyone can experience occupational burnout; it doesn’t matter how much you love your job. Start taking advantage of vacation time, and make sure you’re eating well, exercising, and getting enough sleep. Try mindful meditation, and disconnect from technology every now and then to reset your mind and regain perspective. Implementing simple habits like these in your work and home life can help you to stay happy and productive for many years to come.

For help or advice, from recruitment through to finding your next dream job, please reach out to Louisa Fleet Recruitment at louisa@louisafleet.co.uk or 01189 680831!

This article has been written by our guest blogger Julie Morris - Life & Career Coach you can find out more about Julie's services here http://juliemorris.org/ 

Read More »

6 Strategic Imperatives for your Team’s Opportunities

 


Many organisations get their sales strategies wrong, you may find this blog useful from our friends at Sandler Training. 

"Nothing happens in an organisation until someone sells something.”
It’s true, right?
So, why do so many organisations struggle to get their Sales Strategy right?
Why do so many Sales Leaders struggle with the right framework to develop their Sales Process and Salespeople?
They’re OK Supervisors. But, when it comes to Training, Coaching and Mentoring something’s missing.
It’s certainly not down to a lack of selling skills on the part of the Leaders. Most have travelled the path from Salesperson to Sales Manager to Sales Leader.
They were ‘Aces’ in their day. Perhaps they still are.
There is no lack of Selling skills. Perhaps, the skills they developed in Selling aren’t seen as transferable to the world of Sales Leadership.
Throughout my career I’ve met many Leaders who have struggled to cross the chasm from successful Salesperson to successful Sales Leader. Perhaps, it’s that there is not the same emotional thrill in completing a great coaching call as there was when winning a new deal.
In my career the most memorable moments were when I orchestrated my teams to perform together in a synchronous symphony of sales simplicity (try saying that after eating a Jacob’s Cracker).
The foundation of those successes was an obsessive focus on contextual Coaching. Opportunity and Deal Coaching. Deal Triage. Deal Dress Rehearsals.
Here are 6 steps to help you, the Sales Leader, transfer your selling skills into deal coaching skills.

1 - Who are we selling to?

Firstly, we should look at the opportunity type.
Are we hunting for New Clients?
Or are we developing fresh opportunity in Existing Clients?
‘Hunting’ and ‘Farming’ are vastly different strategies when you are positioning and propositioning products and services.
Have you taken the time to create a clear vision of your Ideal Prospect? Not every Company should qualify to be your teams ‘Prospect’.
How about your Ideal Client? Not all clients present the same development opportunity.
Decide on those ‘Prospects’ that represent the best probability of growth possibility for your people and ensure they maintain an obsessive focus on only that.

2 - What type of Sale Process is it?

Secondly, we should review our Sales Process.
Do you know whether your Sales Process more Demand Creation or Demand Fulfilment? Is it a Short Cycle (less than 3 months) or Long Cycle (more than 3 months)?
Are we Consultative Selling? Creating demand for solutions with a long, continuous, sales cycle. Probably selling to Larger, more complex, Enterprises.
Unique Value Selling? Creating demand for solutions but with a shorter, less complex, sales cycle. Perhaps selling to mid-market (or smaller), less complex, Enterprises.
Is it Account Selling? The demand is within the account, continuous relationship development is required to maintain the client’s loyalty.
Is it Commodity Selling? Fulfilling demand with a sell in the moment approach. Perhaps selling to individuals (B2B2C).
Decide, design, and document your ‘Sales Process’ as it aligns to your ‘Prospects Buying Behaviour’ for your People. Ensure they maintain an obsessive focus on running that process with only minor adaptations.

3 - Who are we up against?

As we begin our Sales Process do we know what the ‘competitive’ factors are in our target ‘Prospect’?
When we proposition our products or services are we typically trying to replace an incumbent supplier?
Is the Prospect or Client looking at more than one solution in parallel? Perhaps they want to separate out solutions across multiple suppliers?
Do we know what (or if) we have as a competitive, strategic, advantage over the oppositions proposition?
Is there any internal ‘politics’ that are going to make our provocation and proposition in this ‘Account’ a challenge?
Develop strong Value Propositions with your People to give them the competitive advantage. Ensure they are fluent in those Value Propositions and that every ‘Prospect’ knows what makes you special.

4 - What’s the problem?

It is a Sales Leaders responsibility to define the reality for their Salespeople.
We need to ensure that we, and our people, intimately understand the challenges our ‘Prospects’ and Clients are facing.
Do we understand the PAIN our ‘Prospects’ are facing?
Do we know the reasons why those PAINs our being faced?
Do we know the impact those PAINs are having on our ‘Prospects’ organisation?
Have we helped the ‘Prospect’ calculate the cost burden to their organisation of these unaddressed PAINs? Resource cost? Time burden? Financial impact? Lost opportunity?
How about the impact it is having on them, personally?
Develop strong Qualification criteria with your People to give them and their ‘Prospect’ clarity of a good fit for your business.
Ensure those Qualifiers are consistently applied, across every deal and that every ‘Prospect’ knows what makes them a good fit for your solutions.

5 - Is it a priority?

It is a Sales Leaders responsibility to help their people navigate the complexities of business.
Have we established that these PAINs are significant enough for somebody in the organisation to decide to do something about them?
Their contact may be head over heels in love with the proposition they’ve made.
But, who else in the organisation knows that there is PAIN that needs to be solved?
Who is else on the organisation is holding the ‘purse strings’ and will invest in solving the PAIN?
Who are decisions going to be made to resolve this PAIN?
Develop with your People clarity of the Organisational Structure of their ‘Prospect’ and work together to navigate the complex corridors to get to the True Buyers.

6 - What now?

Leaders need to hold their teams to a higher standard and require clear, actionable next steps to be put in place at the end of every meeting, to ensure the cycle doesn’t stall.
More Sales Cycles fail, or get delayed, because your team haven’t established clear, well understand, next actions than any other excuse (sorry reason).
Future meeting dates, times, attendee’s, and agenda for the meeting.
If you want to ensure that your teams’ sales cycles aren’t stalling, then keep them accountable to creating Firm Future Commitments.
Try implementing these 6 steps in your next deal coaching meeting with a member of your team. See the difference it can make in you and them.

If you ever feel like chatting yourself then you could always book a complimentary coaching call here: https://calendly.com/davidwdavies

Happy coaching.

 


Many organisations get their sales strategies wrong, you may find this blog useful from our friends at Sandler Training. 

"Nothing happens in an organisation until someone sells something.”
It’s true, right?
So, why do so many organisations struggle to get their Sales Strategy right?
Why do so many Sales Leaders struggle with the right framework to develop their Sales Process and Salespeople?
They’re OK Supervisors. But, when it comes to Training, Coaching and Mentoring something’s missing.
It’s certainly not down to a lack of selling skills on the part of the Leaders. Most have travelled the path from Salesperson to Sales Manager to Sales Leader.
They were ‘Aces’ in their day. Perhaps they still are.
There is no lack of Selling skills. Perhaps, the skills they developed in Selling aren’t seen as transferable to the world of Sales Leadership.
Throughout my career I’ve met many Leaders who have struggled to cross the chasm from successful Salesperson to successful Sales Leader. Perhaps, it’s that there is not the same emotional thrill in completing a great coaching call as there was when winning a new deal.
In my career the most memorable moments were when I orchestrated my teams to perform together in a synchronous symphony of sales simplicity (try saying that after eating a Jacob’s Cracker).
The foundation of those successes was an obsessive focus on contextual Coaching. Opportunity and Deal Coaching. Deal Triage. Deal Dress Rehearsals.
Here are 6 steps to help you, the Sales Leader, transfer your selling skills into deal coaching skills.

1 - Who are we selling to?

Firstly, we should look at the opportunity type.
Are we hunting for New Clients?
Or are we developing fresh opportunity in Existing Clients?
‘Hunting’ and ‘Farming’ are vastly different strategies when you are positioning and propositioning products and services.
Have you taken the time to create a clear vision of your Ideal Prospect? Not every Company should qualify to be your teams ‘Prospect’.
How about your Ideal Client? Not all clients present the same development opportunity.
Decide on those ‘Prospects’ that represent the best probability of growth possibility for your people and ensure they maintain an obsessive focus on only that.

2 - What type of Sale Process is it?

Secondly, we should review our Sales Process.
Do you know whether your Sales Process more Demand Creation or Demand Fulfilment? Is it a Short Cycle (less than 3 months) or Long Cycle (more than 3 months)?
Are we Consultative Selling? Creating demand for solutions with a long, continuous, sales cycle. Probably selling to Larger, more complex, Enterprises.
Unique Value Selling? Creating demand for solutions but with a shorter, less complex, sales cycle. Perhaps selling to mid-market (or smaller), less complex, Enterprises.
Is it Account Selling? The demand is within the account, continuous relationship development is required to maintain the client’s loyalty.
Is it Commodity Selling? Fulfilling demand with a sell in the moment approach. Perhaps selling to individuals (B2B2C).
Decide, design, and document your ‘Sales Process’ as it aligns to your ‘Prospects Buying Behaviour’ for your People. Ensure they maintain an obsessive focus on running that process with only minor adaptations.

3 - Who are we up against?

As we begin our Sales Process do we know what the ‘competitive’ factors are in our target ‘Prospect’?
When we proposition our products or services are we typically trying to replace an incumbent supplier?
Is the Prospect or Client looking at more than one solution in parallel? Perhaps they want to separate out solutions across multiple suppliers?
Do we know what (or if) we have as a competitive, strategic, advantage over the oppositions proposition?
Is there any internal ‘politics’ that are going to make our provocation and proposition in this ‘Account’ a challenge?
Develop strong Value Propositions with your People to give them the competitive advantage. Ensure they are fluent in those Value Propositions and that every ‘Prospect’ knows what makes you special.

4 - What’s the problem?

It is a Sales Leaders responsibility to define the reality for their Salespeople.
We need to ensure that we, and our people, intimately understand the challenges our ‘Prospects’ and Clients are facing.
Do we understand the PAIN our ‘Prospects’ are facing?
Do we know the reasons why those PAINs our being faced?
Do we know the impact those PAINs are having on our ‘Prospects’ organisation?
Have we helped the ‘Prospect’ calculate the cost burden to their organisation of these unaddressed PAINs? Resource cost? Time burden? Financial impact? Lost opportunity?
How about the impact it is having on them, personally?
Develop strong Qualification criteria with your People to give them and their ‘Prospect’ clarity of a good fit for your business.
Ensure those Qualifiers are consistently applied, across every deal and that every ‘Prospect’ knows what makes them a good fit for your solutions.

5 - Is it a priority?

It is a Sales Leaders responsibility to help their people navigate the complexities of business.
Have we established that these PAINs are significant enough for somebody in the organisation to decide to do something about them?
Their contact may be head over heels in love with the proposition they’ve made.
But, who else in the organisation knows that there is PAIN that needs to be solved?
Who is else on the organisation is holding the ‘purse strings’ and will invest in solving the PAIN?
Who are decisions going to be made to resolve this PAIN?
Develop with your People clarity of the Organisational Structure of their ‘Prospect’ and work together to navigate the complex corridors to get to the True Buyers.

6 - What now?

Leaders need to hold their teams to a higher standard and require clear, actionable next steps to be put in place at the end of every meeting, to ensure the cycle doesn’t stall.
More Sales Cycles fail, or get delayed, because your team haven’t established clear, well understand, next actions than any other excuse (sorry reason).
Future meeting dates, times, attendee’s, and agenda for the meeting.
If you want to ensure that your teams’ sales cycles aren’t stalling, then keep them accountable to creating Firm Future Commitments.
Try implementing these 6 steps in your next deal coaching meeting with a member of your team. See the difference it can make in you and them.

If you ever feel like chatting yourself then you could always book a complimentary coaching call here: https://calendly.com/davidwdavies

Happy coaching.

Read More »


Five ways to show that you rock!

The sales recruitment process is becoming increasingly challenging.  Counter offers are prolific and good candidates are interviewing in multiple places and handling numerous job offers.  Offering a job to a candidate is not a guarantee of filling your vacancy.  In the current market you need to ensure you are organised. If you think you’ve found your perfect candidate, follow our 5 steps to show that you rock as an employer. These steps will make sure your offer is not only accepted but that your chosen candidate actually starts!

1. Create a great candidate experience

It is a competitive market and you want to ensure that you are representing your business in the best possible light.  Ensure you assess the candidate’s desires and motivations and know that they match the company’s.  Sell back to them the long term future of joining the business so they see a career not just a job.
Ensure your company has a good public profile - are your social media channels up to date? How do your Glassdoor reviews read?  Little things can turn off a prospective employee.
Over salary, most candidates prefer to understand the training they can expect. As part of the overall candidate experience ensure they meet other people and get a good feeling.  Take time to understand their personal circumstances and whether your offer will suit them.
Do you offer job security?  A candidate will be looking for this, make sure they know you do!

2. Offer the right salary

Job offers are not all about the money, but it is certainly an important factor.  Putting the first offer in at the right level can go a long way in securing a candidate and showing you are committed to hiring them.
Before choosing a figure ensure you have worked with your recruiter and know the following:
Previous salaries
Expectations
Market value of your vacancy
Counter offer risk
Salary offered on the other roles they are interviewing at

Work in partnership with your recruiter to establish an offer that allows room to grow on the salary scale whilst still being attractive.  If you are worried about them still attending other interviews you may want to make it a condition of the offer that they cancel all other interviews upon acceptance.
You can also get creative with your offers by including a bonus if they hit KPI’s, guaranteeing commission for 3-6 months whilst a new salesperson becomes established, or having a salary review at six months.
These little personal touches can be an extra pull for a candidate.

3. Move with speed

Presented the offer verbally?
Then crack on.
Get the offer out in writing by email and by post.  Show the candidate your commitment and get them off the active market.  Give them a deadline to return the contract by, or better yet, set up a time to have a coffee where they can bring it back in and discuss any questions.

4. Keep in touch

Then keep in contact, it can be a confusing time whilst working your notice when you are still being approached for new opportunities.  You want to ensure your new employee isn’t sold a new dream role whilst waiting to start with you.
Reasons to keep in touch with your new salesperson can include:
Invite to drinks with team
Invite to sales meeting/business review
Send details of training and induction
Plus, use your recruiter to keep in touch on a regular basis, they can act as a third party and ensure the candidate is still ready to start and address and feed back any concerns that pop up along the way.

5. Use your recruiter

Recruiters are meant to be your business partners when you are hiring a new employee and at this point I would ensure they are doing their job to their full potential.  The follow up with the recruiter is vital, as they will know the candidate’s desires and needs and can discuss with you.  Post first interview this will give you the tools to ensure you can sell your job appropriately at second interview and secure the candidate you want.

Post offer, they can keep in touch to make sure the contract is received and check the candidate is happy.  They should have a strong, empathetic relationship with the candidate, so regular phone calls will ensure they know if any issues arise.
Plus they can ask the questions a business can’t.  What opportunities have they been presented with since taking your role, how was the counter offer received?  What did their friends and family think of their new move?
A recruiter who builds strong relationships is invaluable at this stage, so ensure yours is working well for you.

Looking for a great recruiter to help you secure your next superstar candidate? Then get in touch!
You can also 'like' our Facebook page and follow us on Twitter and Linked In


Five ways to show that you rock!

The sales recruitment process is becoming increasingly challenging.  Counter offers are prolific and good candidates are interviewing in multiple places and handling numerous job offers.  Offering a job to a candidate is not a guarantee of filling your vacancy.  In the current market you need to ensure you are organised. If you think you’ve found your perfect candidate, follow our 5 steps to show that you rock as an employer. These steps will make sure your offer is not only accepted but that your chosen candidate actually starts!

1. Create a great candidate experience

It is a competitive market and you want to ensure that you are representing your business in the best possible light.  Ensure you assess the candidate’s desires and motivations and know that they match the company’s.  Sell back to them the long term future of joining the business so they see a career not just a job.
Ensure your company has a good public profile - are your social media channels up to date? How do your Glassdoor reviews read?  Little things can turn off a prospective employee.
Over salary, most candidates prefer to understand the training they can expect. As part of the overall candidate experience ensure they meet other people and get a good feeling.  Take time to understand their personal circumstances and whether your offer will suit them.
Do you offer job security?  A candidate will be looking for this, make sure they know you do!

2. Offer the right salary

Job offers are not all about the money, but it is certainly an important factor.  Putting the first offer in at the right level can go a long way in securing a candidate and showing you are committed to hiring them.
Before choosing a figure ensure you have worked with your recruiter and know the following:
Previous salaries
Expectations
Market value of your vacancy
Counter offer risk
Salary offered on the other roles they are interviewing at

Work in partnership with your recruiter to establish an offer that allows room to grow on the salary scale whilst still being attractive.  If you are worried about them still attending other interviews you may want to make it a condition of the offer that they cancel all other interviews upon acceptance.
You can also get creative with your offers by including a bonus if they hit KPI’s, guaranteeing commission for 3-6 months whilst a new salesperson becomes established, or having a salary review at six months.
These little personal touches can be an extra pull for a candidate.

3. Move with speed

Presented the offer verbally?
Then crack on.
Get the offer out in writing by email and by post.  Show the candidate your commitment and get them off the active market.  Give them a deadline to return the contract by, or better yet, set up a time to have a coffee where they can bring it back in and discuss any questions.

4. Keep in touch

Then keep in contact, it can be a confusing time whilst working your notice when you are still being approached for new opportunities.  You want to ensure your new employee isn’t sold a new dream role whilst waiting to start with you.
Reasons to keep in touch with your new salesperson can include:
Invite to drinks with team
Invite to sales meeting/business review
Send details of training and induction
Plus, use your recruiter to keep in touch on a regular basis, they can act as a third party and ensure the candidate is still ready to start and address and feed back any concerns that pop up along the way.

5. Use your recruiter

Recruiters are meant to be your business partners when you are hiring a new employee and at this point I would ensure they are doing their job to their full potential.  The follow up with the recruiter is vital, as they will know the candidate’s desires and needs and can discuss with you.  Post first interview this will give you the tools to ensure you can sell your job appropriately at second interview and secure the candidate you want.

Post offer, they can keep in touch to make sure the contract is received and check the candidate is happy.  They should have a strong, empathetic relationship with the candidate, so regular phone calls will ensure they know if any issues arise.
Plus they can ask the questions a business can’t.  What opportunities have they been presented with since taking your role, how was the counter offer received?  What did their friends and family think of their new move?
A recruiter who builds strong relationships is invaluable at this stage, so ensure yours is working well for you.

Looking for a great recruiter to help you secure your next superstar candidate? Then get in touch!
You can also 'like' our Facebook page and follow us on Twitter and Linked In
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The Challenges Sales Teams Face When Returning To Work




The COVID-19 pandemic came out of the blue and disrupted everything. Almost every sector of the economy was upended, and most businesses had to lay off or furlough some employees. Even with businesses gradually resuming operations with the eased lock-down, there's no denying some things may never go back to how they used to be. As organisations adjust to this new norm in the business landscape, salespeople will be amongst the most critical employees in getting businesses moving again. However, this won't be without challenges. Here, we will analyse the challenges salespeople are likely to face as they return to work.

What changes are salespeople expected to endure and get used to as they return to work?


With corona virus forcing lots of businesses to cut back on travel and in-person meetings, salespeople returning to work will have to carry on with as minimal contact as possible with clients and prospects. This means that phone calls or video conferencing calls will have to replace what could have been face to face meetings. Be prepared to make your sales pitch over web-based presentations instead of on-site meetings. Altogether, physical meetings may not be an option, as your client may be working exclusively from home, or just not meeting physically with anyone until the pandemic subsides. This is a change that might prove difficult for the sales team as physical interactions oftentimes provides an advantage for salespeople. Without this advantage, the sales team has their work cut out for them as they'll need to go the extra mile to communicate their value and ultimately make the sale.

How will people cope with going back to work after furlough?


After being on furlough for weeks, it is sensible to expect that some employees may struggle with the transition back into working full time again. It is important to understand that your sales team will not just pick up from where they left off. It won't be business as usual, and without proper training to slowly ease them back into this new work culture, it may not be business at all for a while. The company can start by training the salespeople on how to engage with customers online using technology as in-person meetings and face to face conversations may not be possible for a while. Focusing on training and managing expectations around what can and will be achieved upon their return to work is important and will give everyone the time they need to settle into this new normal, and back to contacting and engaging clients.

How can business owners deal with uncertainties about returning to work?


One of the key qualities of an excellent salesperson is confidence. Low levels of confidence in your sales team will definitely have a negative effect on performance and considering the importance of the sales team to cash inflow, the last thing your business needs is poor performance from that department. With so much uncertainty in the air, companies should prepare to handle staff who may feel anxious about returning to work. Like earlier mentioned, proper training will help the salespeople navigate and get comfortable quickly as they return to work after being furloughed. It’s also worth noting that experiences of lock-down are varied; while some may have enjoyed it, others may have found it extremely difficult. Having support in place for those that need it is a worthwhile step to take to ensure a happy and productive workplace.

How will the pandemic change the landscape of sales going forward?


Owing to the pandemic, most, if not every, customer's situation has changed. Salespeople would need to build sales interaction around understanding the customer’s new perception of the world and how they can add value to customers. Businesses might need to re engineer their solutions to help customers with their corona virus concerns. Essentially, the sales team will need to rethink what the key benefits of their products and services are and how they can angle those benefits to help their clients ease those corona virus concerns.

For the foreseeable future, your sales pitch must explain to clients how your solutions can help them stabilize or improve operations, adapt to corona virus and get through the crisis. As earlier mentioned, technology will now become a core component of the business landscape and people in sales need to get comfortable using technology and managing online sales conversations. Basically, sales and managing directors need to get more creative with collaboration tools, communication apps and other technologies to keep sales advancing in the market.

The landscape of sales may never be the same again, but that isn't necessarily a bad thing. As salespeople adjust to working in the current climate, they will need to adapt to the (temporary) changes in consumer behaviour and embrace digital opportunities to stay in contact with clients. Your ability to understand your client's situation and work through the change will be key to delivering value.


Many sales leaders have been forced to evaluate their current sales and support teams, and make changes where necessary to ensure they are in the strongest position to meet the company goals moving forward. If you would like a confidential discussion about how we can help you build and retain a winning sales team ready for the new normal, we’d be delighted to arrange an appointment for you to speak with Louisa.


And please do join our Sales Leadership Q and A group on Facebook, where we have sales leaders and experts sharing best practice, resources and collaborating. Perfect if you're leading or building a sales team. 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/643702969807741/

Get in touch with one of the team today:










The COVID-19 pandemic came out of the blue and disrupted everything. Almost every sector of the economy was upended, and most businesses had to lay off or furlough some employees. Even with businesses gradually resuming operations with the eased lock-down, there's no denying some things may never go back to how they used to be. As organisations adjust to this new norm in the business landscape, salespeople will be amongst the most critical employees in getting businesses moving again. However, this won't be without challenges. Here, we will analyse the challenges salespeople are likely to face as they return to work.

What changes are salespeople expected to endure and get used to as they return to work?


With corona virus forcing lots of businesses to cut back on travel and in-person meetings, salespeople returning to work will have to carry on with as minimal contact as possible with clients and prospects. This means that phone calls or video conferencing calls will have to replace what could have been face to face meetings. Be prepared to make your sales pitch over web-based presentations instead of on-site meetings. Altogether, physical meetings may not be an option, as your client may be working exclusively from home, or just not meeting physically with anyone until the pandemic subsides. This is a change that might prove difficult for the sales team as physical interactions oftentimes provides an advantage for salespeople. Without this advantage, the sales team has their work cut out for them as they'll need to go the extra mile to communicate their value and ultimately make the sale.

How will people cope with going back to work after furlough?


After being on furlough for weeks, it is sensible to expect that some employees may struggle with the transition back into working full time again. It is important to understand that your sales team will not just pick up from where they left off. It won't be business as usual, and without proper training to slowly ease them back into this new work culture, it may not be business at all for a while. The company can start by training the salespeople on how to engage with customers online using technology as in-person meetings and face to face conversations may not be possible for a while. Focusing on training and managing expectations around what can and will be achieved upon their return to work is important and will give everyone the time they need to settle into this new normal, and back to contacting and engaging clients.

How can business owners deal with uncertainties about returning to work?


One of the key qualities of an excellent salesperson is confidence. Low levels of confidence in your sales team will definitely have a negative effect on performance and considering the importance of the sales team to cash inflow, the last thing your business needs is poor performance from that department. With so much uncertainty in the air, companies should prepare to handle staff who may feel anxious about returning to work. Like earlier mentioned, proper training will help the salespeople navigate and get comfortable quickly as they return to work after being furloughed. It’s also worth noting that experiences of lock-down are varied; while some may have enjoyed it, others may have found it extremely difficult. Having support in place for those that need it is a worthwhile step to take to ensure a happy and productive workplace.

How will the pandemic change the landscape of sales going forward?


Owing to the pandemic, most, if not every, customer's situation has changed. Salespeople would need to build sales interaction around understanding the customer’s new perception of the world and how they can add value to customers. Businesses might need to re engineer their solutions to help customers with their corona virus concerns. Essentially, the sales team will need to rethink what the key benefits of their products and services are and how they can angle those benefits to help their clients ease those corona virus concerns.

For the foreseeable future, your sales pitch must explain to clients how your solutions can help them stabilize or improve operations, adapt to corona virus and get through the crisis. As earlier mentioned, technology will now become a core component of the business landscape and people in sales need to get comfortable using technology and managing online sales conversations. Basically, sales and managing directors need to get more creative with collaboration tools, communication apps and other technologies to keep sales advancing in the market.

The landscape of sales may never be the same again, but that isn't necessarily a bad thing. As salespeople adjust to working in the current climate, they will need to adapt to the (temporary) changes in consumer behaviour and embrace digital opportunities to stay in contact with clients. Your ability to understand your client's situation and work through the change will be key to delivering value.


Many sales leaders have been forced to evaluate their current sales and support teams, and make changes where necessary to ensure they are in the strongest position to meet the company goals moving forward. If you would like a confidential discussion about how we can help you build and retain a winning sales team ready for the new normal, we’d be delighted to arrange an appointment for you to speak with Louisa.


And please do join our Sales Leadership Q and A group on Facebook, where we have sales leaders and experts sharing best practice, resources and collaborating. Perfect if you're leading or building a sales team. 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/643702969807741/

Get in touch with one of the team today:







Read More »

Getting Ready To Restructure Your Business




If like many organisations you are in a position where you may need to look at restructuring your business, you may find this blog useful from our friends at Organic P&O Solutions.


Getting Ready To Restructure Your Business? 6 Steps You Must Follow.

To be successful, your business will have to evolve continually. As it grows, you’re likely to have to reorganise at various points on your journey. Sometimes you might want to make changes to take advantage of new opportunities. At other times, you may need to adapt your business model to respond to challenges.


In our experience, a company that has grown to employ 20 – 25 employees and beyond can anticipate having to restructure every 12 to 18 months on average.


As businesses adjust to trading in the current climate, many will likely need to look at how they are structured. This might involve reviewing and redefining the roles of some employees, and without suitable alternative positions available within a new set up, it might mean having to make some redundancies.


Understandably for employees, an organisational restructure can be an unsettling time, which means it’s important to manage it well. The consequences of not doing so can include added disruption to business, a damaged reputation – and where redundancies are involved, time and expense in defending employment tribunal claims.


In planning any restructure likely to result in changes to job roles or redundancies, it’s essential for an employer to consult with their employees before they make any final decisions.


Here at Organic P&O Solutions, we help business owners and management teams make the (sometimes tough) decisions required to change the shape of their organisations – and to do so in a way that is compliant and fair for all parties.

When a restructure goes wrong, it’s often because the business involved has not fulfilled its obligation to consult with affected staff, or because somewhere in the process, it has failed to follow the correct procedures.


If you’re planning a restructure in your organisation, having the support of a professional HR advisor is highly recommended. Because every restructure is different and has its own unique dynamics, there’s much more to consider than the linear process. This said, there are some fundamental points to keep in mind when you’re preparing to implement a change like this:


1. Review all your business options


Based on the information you have available, and what you are reasonably able to anticipate, you will need to consider all the business options open to you.

If for example, your business has experienced a significant drop in revenue, you’ll need to review – and where possible, reduce overheads in the short term. Looking further ahead and using data extracted from your management accounts, you’ll need to calculate how long your business will be able to trade on the reduced income – and consider what options are open to you longer term should the situation persist.

2. Review staffing against your business options


When you have listed your business options, you will be in a position to review your staffing structure in relation to each potential scenario. It’s important to show you’ve considered your options in this order.

You’ll need to consider each option against the key criteria, making sure you’re being fair and reasonable at each juncture – being extremely mindful at this point to set aside the personal situations or personalities of individual employees.

3. Recognise your obligation to consult with staff


Don’t make the mistake of thinking that restructuring your organisation is purely a business decision, and you don’t need to consult with your employees.


If you’re planning a restructure that’s going to require staff to have to change roles or result in redundancies, you’re statutorily bound to engage in a meaningful consultation process with those staff who will be affected.


Crucially, this doesn’t mean sharing a restructuring plan that’s set in stone and just expecting staff to adopt it.  All too often, we hear of business owners who work on a restructuring plan in isolation, before presenting it to their workforce as a fait acompli: an action more likely to lead to conflict and arbitration than collaboration.


Ideally, it’s best to communicate with staff openly and honestly from the outset. This way, there will be complete transparency before the consultation process begins. You’ll have to allow time for affected employees to respond with alternative solutions, and no definitive decisions can be made until the consultation process has been completed.


4. Pause recruitment activity


If you’re planning any redundancies as part of your restructure, you’ll need to consider whether those employees affected might be offered any other suitable alternative employment within your organisation. To this end, you should pause any recruitment activity during the process.


5. Advise affected staff


When you have identified your preferred restructure route, your next step must be to notify any employees who will potentially be affected, formally advising them that you intend to enter a consultation process.


6. Consult with affected staff


Having taken the appropriate steps up to this point, you’re now ready to consult with affected employees. You will be able to share your proposed restructure plan together with your reasons and rationale for putting it forward.


At the same time, you’ll need to make it clear that no decisions have yet been taken, and you are open to any alternative solutions those affected might want to propose.


You must leave space for plans to evolve and change, and time for other parties to put forward alternative solutions and have them fully considered – so that by the time a final decision is reached, all options have been explored.


I often liken the process of going into a restructure to kicking a rugby ball into the air. In the same way you can’t know which way the ball will bounce on landing, it’s virtually impossible to predict how a restructure proposal will be received when you’re dealing with people and emotions.


Employers will frequently go in one of two directions. They’ll either procrastinate and go around in circles as they attempt to get inside their employees’ heads – trying to anticipate and address questions they can’t possibly know. Or they’ll simply impose their preferred restructure option without consultation, believing they’ve explored all avenues and no other solution is available.

The first of these routes wastes time and energy and is ultimately ineffective as the clarity of any original objective is lost. The second is clearly unlawful.

Going back to my rugby ball analogy, a restructure can have a clearly defined process, but it won’t be linear, and along the way, it will bob and weave. To ensure it runs smoothly and results in a successful outcome, the support of an HR professional who can help you manage the human aspects involved with implementing change – as well as guiding you in respect of compliance, is essential.

Focusing exclusively on compliance when making decisions is not necessarily the best way forward. In some situations, taking human considerations into account might cost you a little more time and/or money – but save you a lot in terms of how your business is perceived by others. This may be a particularly important consideration for owners of small and mid-size companies who have a high profile in their local community.

Can We Help Your Business Restructure?

Do you need to change the shape of your business? Organic P&O Solutions can advise and support you through every step of the process.  We’ll help you balance compliance with fairness so that your team transitions smoothly and painlessly, and we’ll make sure that when your restructure is complete, the reputation of your business – and your conscience – remain fully intact!

Call us today to arrange an initial conversation on 01344 441 043.




If like many organisations you are in a position where you may need to look at restructuring your business, you may find this blog useful from our friends at Organic P&O Solutions.


Getting Ready To Restructure Your Business? 6 Steps You Must Follow.

To be successful, your business will have to evolve continually. As it grows, you’re likely to have to reorganise at various points on your journey. Sometimes you might want to make changes to take advantage of new opportunities. At other times, you may need to adapt your business model to respond to challenges.


In our experience, a company that has grown to employ 20 – 25 employees and beyond can anticipate having to restructure every 12 to 18 months on average.


As businesses adjust to trading in the current climate, many will likely need to look at how they are structured. This might involve reviewing and redefining the roles of some employees, and without suitable alternative positions available within a new set up, it might mean having to make some redundancies.


Understandably for employees, an organisational restructure can be an unsettling time, which means it’s important to manage it well. The consequences of not doing so can include added disruption to business, a damaged reputation – and where redundancies are involved, time and expense in defending employment tribunal claims.


In planning any restructure likely to result in changes to job roles or redundancies, it’s essential for an employer to consult with their employees before they make any final decisions.


Here at Organic P&O Solutions, we help business owners and management teams make the (sometimes tough) decisions required to change the shape of their organisations – and to do so in a way that is compliant and fair for all parties.

When a restructure goes wrong, it’s often because the business involved has not fulfilled its obligation to consult with affected staff, or because somewhere in the process, it has failed to follow the correct procedures.


If you’re planning a restructure in your organisation, having the support of a professional HR advisor is highly recommended. Because every restructure is different and has its own unique dynamics, there’s much more to consider than the linear process. This said, there are some fundamental points to keep in mind when you’re preparing to implement a change like this:


1. Review all your business options


Based on the information you have available, and what you are reasonably able to anticipate, you will need to consider all the business options open to you.

If for example, your business has experienced a significant drop in revenue, you’ll need to review – and where possible, reduce overheads in the short term. Looking further ahead and using data extracted from your management accounts, you’ll need to calculate how long your business will be able to trade on the reduced income – and consider what options are open to you longer term should the situation persist.

2. Review staffing against your business options


When you have listed your business options, you will be in a position to review your staffing structure in relation to each potential scenario. It’s important to show you’ve considered your options in this order.

You’ll need to consider each option against the key criteria, making sure you’re being fair and reasonable at each juncture – being extremely mindful at this point to set aside the personal situations or personalities of individual employees.

3. Recognise your obligation to consult with staff


Don’t make the mistake of thinking that restructuring your organisation is purely a business decision, and you don’t need to consult with your employees.


If you’re planning a restructure that’s going to require staff to have to change roles or result in redundancies, you’re statutorily bound to engage in a meaningful consultation process with those staff who will be affected.


Crucially, this doesn’t mean sharing a restructuring plan that’s set in stone and just expecting staff to adopt it.  All too often, we hear of business owners who work on a restructuring plan in isolation, before presenting it to their workforce as a fait acompli: an action more likely to lead to conflict and arbitration than collaboration.


Ideally, it’s best to communicate with staff openly and honestly from the outset. This way, there will be complete transparency before the consultation process begins. You’ll have to allow time for affected employees to respond with alternative solutions, and no definitive decisions can be made until the consultation process has been completed.


4. Pause recruitment activity


If you’re planning any redundancies as part of your restructure, you’ll need to consider whether those employees affected might be offered any other suitable alternative employment within your organisation. To this end, you should pause any recruitment activity during the process.


5. Advise affected staff


When you have identified your preferred restructure route, your next step must be to notify any employees who will potentially be affected, formally advising them that you intend to enter a consultation process.


6. Consult with affected staff


Having taken the appropriate steps up to this point, you’re now ready to consult with affected employees. You will be able to share your proposed restructure plan together with your reasons and rationale for putting it forward.


At the same time, you’ll need to make it clear that no decisions have yet been taken, and you are open to any alternative solutions those affected might want to propose.


You must leave space for plans to evolve and change, and time for other parties to put forward alternative solutions and have them fully considered – so that by the time a final decision is reached, all options have been explored.


I often liken the process of going into a restructure to kicking a rugby ball into the air. In the same way you can’t know which way the ball will bounce on landing, it’s virtually impossible to predict how a restructure proposal will be received when you’re dealing with people and emotions.


Employers will frequently go in one of two directions. They’ll either procrastinate and go around in circles as they attempt to get inside their employees’ heads – trying to anticipate and address questions they can’t possibly know. Or they’ll simply impose their preferred restructure option without consultation, believing they’ve explored all avenues and no other solution is available.

The first of these routes wastes time and energy and is ultimately ineffective as the clarity of any original objective is lost. The second is clearly unlawful.

Going back to my rugby ball analogy, a restructure can have a clearly defined process, but it won’t be linear, and along the way, it will bob and weave. To ensure it runs smoothly and results in a successful outcome, the support of an HR professional who can help you manage the human aspects involved with implementing change – as well as guiding you in respect of compliance, is essential.

Focusing exclusively on compliance when making decisions is not necessarily the best way forward. In some situations, taking human considerations into account might cost you a little more time and/or money – but save you a lot in terms of how your business is perceived by others. This may be a particularly important consideration for owners of small and mid-size companies who have a high profile in their local community.

Can We Help Your Business Restructure?

Do you need to change the shape of your business? Organic P&O Solutions can advise and support you through every step of the process.  We’ll help you balance compliance with fairness so that your team transitions smoothly and painlessly, and we’ll make sure that when your restructure is complete, the reputation of your business – and your conscience – remain fully intact!

Call us today to arrange an initial conversation on 01344 441 043.

Read More »