Friday, 10 August 2018

How to Fight the Counter Offer!





Previously, I’ve spoken about the danger of counter offers but what do you do if you’re on the receiving end of offering someone a job and they have come back and say that someone has made them a counter offer. In this kind of situation, there are 3 things you can do.

The Recruiter


1-Firstly, speak to your recruiter. An expert recruiter will know this person much better than you do, and they will be able to investigate and find out where this potential employee’s head is currently at. They should then be able to come back and advise you accordingly on what the likelihood is of you being able to persuade this person to accept your offer and the best steps for you to take in order to do that.
The other thing your recruiter could do is restart the process and begin thinking about other candidates immediately. The could even go back to other candidates that have already been through your process and were very close to getting the job – it may well be worth talking to them and seeing what they are doing and if they are still looking and perhaps set up another meeting with the potential candidate for you to reconsider.

The Individual


2-Secondly, you could speak directly with the individual themselves. If you’re not really using a recruiter or you’d rather speak to the individual directly, simply ask them “How can I help you to make your decision?” Ask them if they have made up their minds yet, if they need some help or perhaps they’d like to meet you for a coffee just, so you can understand what’s happened. It’s the least that they owe you, so most people will do this.

Put yourself in their shoes and empathise with them that it’s a difficult decision to make. If you have been in a similar situation within your own life, then it might be an idea to share those experiences with them. Show kindness and support for them in their situation and there may be an opportunity for you to resell the job back to them using all the things that they told you about in their interview that they really liked about your career opportunity. If you can remind them of all these things, it might help them get the facts straight in their own minds about what it is they really want going forward.
The worst-case scenario is that they are going to stay where they are – the majority of cases like this do result in the employee staying where they are as they will often give their current employer that second chance. However, if you make it a good experience for the candidate then they may feel so guilty about letting you down they may well even refer a few people they know who can do the job and that they have access to and you can speak to immediately – if not do ask them to refer you if it does end up in this scenario.

Give a Short Timescale 


3-Finally, be sure to give them a short timescale for a decision – this shouldn’t be allowed to be dragged out by them as it’s going to bring everything to a grinding halt. Perhaps a suggested timescale would be within 24 hours of that coffee or 72 hours from that initial call letting you know about the counter offer. You both need to know where you stand.

So, to summarise-Have a back-up plan. Small timescale for a final decision. Be smart for the best outcome from this for you and your company and lastly… leave that door open. 8 out of 10 candidates who are in this situation are back on the job market within 6 months so don’t burn any bridges as you may find they’ll be back knocking on your door very quickly.


You can get in touch with us for lots more recruitment help and advice below:
info@louisafleet.co.uk | 01189 680831
Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn

0 Read More »

Wednesday, 1 August 2018

Beware The Dangers of Counter Offers




Fact – 50% of job seekers will look for a job, accept a job and end up being persuaded to stay where they are. Why does this happen and what can you do about it?

Why does it happen?


Normally this happens because job seekers don’t believe that their employer will fix their problems. They don’t feel valued enough and they feel like they’ve got no choice but to look for another job.
And employers don’t always take their employees seriously enough. They brush off the warning signs and they don’t do anything about it until they are about to lose that person. The reason that they do something about it then, is because they know that it is going to cost them probably twice as much as the current person’s salary to find somebody else. So they agree to pay their current employee more money and make a few tweaks to get them to stay

What can we do about this?


Candidates – talk to your boss

Firstly, as a candidate, before you start the job seeking process, try and have a really straight conversation with your boss. Tell them what you are unhappy about and explain that unless these things are able to  be fixed, that you will have no choice but to start looking elsewhere. And see what happens. At least this way it lays it completely on the line that they know you are serious about this and hopefully they will do something about it before you start the job seeking process.


Employers – listen to the warning signs

Don’t brush off the warning signs. If you’ve got a valued employee working for you, you don’t want to lose them, so listen to the warning signs before it’s too late.


Hiring managers – use the interview process

If you are somebody who is recruiting, you can address this in the interview process. Be wary of people that love their job, love their company but feel they want more – more money, more recognition, more responsibility. Ask them what it would take for them to stay – what would their employer need to give them? And if they were to give them that, would they actually stay? That will give you the measure of how likely this is to happen.

Try and focus on the candidates that have other reasons for leaving – ones that can’t be fixed by their current employer. And also candidates that are looking at your opportunity for the whole career opportunity – the job, the company, the culture – things that they are definitely not getting at their current place of work or in their current position. These people are more likely to be the ones that will accept and stay for the long term.

Hopefully this has helped give you an insight into the subject of counter offers – look out for more on this coming soon! Do drop us a line in the comments to let us know about your experiences – have you ever lost a candidate at the last moment due to a counter offer? Maybe you have been a jobseeker, found a great job and been persuaded to stay by your existing company – we’d love to hear how that worked out for you in the end?

For more help an information on staff retention, starting at offer stage, please click here for a copy of my white paper.

You can get in touch with us for lots more recruitment help and advice below:
info@louisafleet.co.uk | 01189 680831
Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn




Fact – 50% of job seekers will look for a job, accept a job and end up being persuaded to stay where they are. Why does this happen and what can you do about it?

Why does it happen?


Normally this happens because job seekers don’t believe that their employer will fix their problems. They don’t feel valued enough and they feel like they’ve got no choice but to look for another job.
And employers don’t always take their employees seriously enough. They brush off the warning signs and they don’t do anything about it until they are about to lose that person. The reason that they do something about it then, is because they know that it is going to cost them probably twice as much as the current person’s salary to find somebody else. So they agree to pay their current employee more money and make a few tweaks to get them to stay

What can we do about this?


Candidates – talk to your boss

Firstly, as a candidate, before you start the job seeking process, try and have a really straight conversation with your boss. Tell them what you are unhappy about and explain that unless these things are able to  be fixed, that you will have no choice but to start looking elsewhere. And see what happens. At least this way it lays it completely on the line that they know you are serious about this and hopefully they will do something about it before you start the job seeking process.


Employers – listen to the warning signs

Don’t brush off the warning signs. If you’ve got a valued employee working for you, you don’t want to lose them, so listen to the warning signs before it’s too late.


Hiring managers – use the interview process

If you are somebody who is recruiting, you can address this in the interview process. Be wary of people that love their job, love their company but feel they want more – more money, more recognition, more responsibility. Ask them what it would take for them to stay – what would their employer need to give them? And if they were to give them that, would they actually stay? That will give you the measure of how likely this is to happen.

Try and focus on the candidates that have other reasons for leaving – ones that can’t be fixed by their current employer. And also candidates that are looking at your opportunity for the whole career opportunity – the job, the company, the culture – things that they are definitely not getting at their current place of work or in their current position. These people are more likely to be the ones that will accept and stay for the long term.

Hopefully this has helped give you an insight into the subject of counter offers – look out for more on this coming soon! Do drop us a line in the comments to let us know about your experiences – have you ever lost a candidate at the last moment due to a counter offer? Maybe you have been a jobseeker, found a great job and been persuaded to stay by your existing company – we’d love to hear how that worked out for you in the end?

For more help an information on staff retention, starting at offer stage, please click here for a copy of my white paper.

You can get in touch with us for lots more recruitment help and advice below:
info@louisafleet.co.uk | 01189 680831
Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn

Read More »

Tuesday, 24 July 2018

Top Tips for staying in touch with your new hire






We have previously spoken about the importance of staying in touch with your new hire. But what if you don’t know where to start or you’re not sure of how to stay in touch? Well here are some of our top reasons for staying in touch, because clearly what you don’t want to be doing is ringing up every week just to ask “Are you still coming on board? Have you had any other offers?”  That’s just going to sound weird and annoying!

There are lots of different touch points and reasons for you to stay in touch with your new hire so you can be in regular contact every week during their notice period and these are all really good reasons that will keep your new employee engaged and excited about joining you.

1. Send out the contract

Send out the contract within 48 hours of offering the job. This sets everything off to a great start and shows that you are somebody that is organised, prepared and enthusiastic about getting your new hire the information so that they can resign as soon as possible.
And it doesn’t stop there – arrange to get together so that they can personally hand you the signed contract back and so that they can ask any questions they may have. After that meeting you can then be absolutely certain that no stone has been left unturned and they have handed back that signed contract completely committed to coming on board with you. The other great thing about doing it this way is that it’s a great chance to have a coffee with them and get to know your new hire outside of the interview process.

2. Get in contact around resignation time

Find out when they plan to hand their notice in and then give them a call or send a message the day before just to let them know you’re thinking about them. It can be a difficult and emotional time, particularly if someone has been with their current employer for a while, so show them you care and reassure them about how excited you are to have them on board and wish them well for their difficult meeting. And then follow them up the next day as well to see how it all went.
This really does go down well. A few hiring managers we have worked with have done this in the past and the feedback we get shows that it’s a really good sign of a caring boss when they are willing to go to these lengths for their new hire.


3. Introduce your new hire to the team

Help your new hire feel part of the team so they don’t feel like a stranger on their first day. You could do this by inviting them to a social event – maybe drinks after work or a summer barbecue. Get them involved, get them talking with your staff, get them engaging with the rest of the team during their notice period.

4. Send the training and induction plan

This is so important. I’ve got some fantastic clients that do this really well and the feedback is always amazing. I’ve also come across many companies that don’t do this well or at all and it is a negative start for an employee with your company if you don’t.

So, organise and send out a thorough training and induction plan so your new hire knows exactly what to expect from their first few weeks – where they will be spending time, who they will be spending time with, an idea of what their training will consist of. If you send this out about a week before they start, you’re sure to have a very impressed new starter as a result.

5. Be in contact

Be in contact a few days before to wish them luck for their first day. Be on call for any last minute questions. If you’re not going to be there for their first day, that is ok, but do let them know. People are nervous when they join a company, they like to know what to expect, and if things are going to be a bit different it’s nice to manage their expectations.

Do welcome your new employee on board either by a phone call or face to face in the morning and do follow up to see how their first day has gone.
And keep in regular contact during their training and induction and let them know when they will be spending time with you.

To watch my vlog on this subject please click here

To download a copy of our white paper on recruitment and retention please click here

If you’re a business looking for help with your recruitment please contact us on
info@louisafleet.co.uk | 01189 680831| Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn






We have previously spoken about the importance of staying in touch with your new hire. But what if you don’t know where to start or you’re not sure of how to stay in touch? Well here are some of our top reasons for staying in touch, because clearly what you don’t want to be doing is ringing up every week just to ask “Are you still coming on board? Have you had any other offers?”  That’s just going to sound weird and annoying!

There are lots of different touch points and reasons for you to stay in touch with your new hire so you can be in regular contact every week during their notice period and these are all really good reasons that will keep your new employee engaged and excited about joining you.

1. Send out the contract

Send out the contract within 48 hours of offering the job. This sets everything off to a great start and shows that you are somebody that is organised, prepared and enthusiastic about getting your new hire the information so that they can resign as soon as possible.
And it doesn’t stop there – arrange to get together so that they can personally hand you the signed contract back and so that they can ask any questions they may have. After that meeting you can then be absolutely certain that no stone has been left unturned and they have handed back that signed contract completely committed to coming on board with you. The other great thing about doing it this way is that it’s a great chance to have a coffee with them and get to know your new hire outside of the interview process.

2. Get in contact around resignation time

Find out when they plan to hand their notice in and then give them a call or send a message the day before just to let them know you’re thinking about them. It can be a difficult and emotional time, particularly if someone has been with their current employer for a while, so show them you care and reassure them about how excited you are to have them on board and wish them well for their difficult meeting. And then follow them up the next day as well to see how it all went.
This really does go down well. A few hiring managers we have worked with have done this in the past and the feedback we get shows that it’s a really good sign of a caring boss when they are willing to go to these lengths for their new hire.


3. Introduce your new hire to the team

Help your new hire feel part of the team so they don’t feel like a stranger on their first day. You could do this by inviting them to a social event – maybe drinks after work or a summer barbecue. Get them involved, get them talking with your staff, get them engaging with the rest of the team during their notice period.

4. Send the training and induction plan

This is so important. I’ve got some fantastic clients that do this really well and the feedback is always amazing. I’ve also come across many companies that don’t do this well or at all and it is a negative start for an employee with your company if you don’t.

So, organise and send out a thorough training and induction plan so your new hire knows exactly what to expect from their first few weeks – where they will be spending time, who they will be spending time with, an idea of what their training will consist of. If you send this out about a week before they start, you’re sure to have a very impressed new starter as a result.

5. Be in contact

Be in contact a few days before to wish them luck for their first day. Be on call for any last minute questions. If you’re not going to be there for their first day, that is ok, but do let them know. People are nervous when they join a company, they like to know what to expect, and if things are going to be a bit different it’s nice to manage their expectations.

Do welcome your new employee on board either by a phone call or face to face in the morning and do follow up to see how their first day has gone.
And keep in regular contact during their training and induction and let them know when they will be spending time with you.

To watch my vlog on this subject please click here

To download a copy of our white paper on recruitment and retention please click here

If you’re a business looking for help with your recruitment please contact us on
info@louisafleet.co.uk | 01189 680831| Twitter | Facebook | LinkedIn

Read More »

Friday, 13 July 2018

This one mistake could cost you your new hire!






Why do some companies allow themselves to lose their new hire before they have even had their first day? What causes this to happen?

“I’ve accepted a job but I’m still open to offers”

We hear this every day from various candidates and the first question we ask is “why”?

And the reasons why are quite simple and they are really easy things that you can rectify as an employer in your quest to make sure that you retain your new hire, having spent lots of time, lots of money and lots of resources to find them.

So what is the reason?

The grass is always greener?

You might think the reason is because people might be greedy, always looking out for a better offer, with a ‘grass is always greener’ kind of attitude. Or you might think that some people just want to mess companies or recruiters around.

Well actually, this isn’t the case, not in my experience.

“I’ve not heard a thing since I was offered the job”

There is one big reason that is a huge factor in people still continuing to keep their options open and hear about other job opportunities. And that is the fact that they have had zero or very limited communication from their new employer since they were offered the job. Nothing. Zero. Not a dicky bird.

The answer to the “why?” question from earlier is often that the candidate hasn’t heard a thing from their new employer since the job offer. The contract took ages to come through, they haven’t seen their boss since the first interview because he wasn’t even in the 2nd one.

“It’s making me nervous”

A candidate I spoke to recently said -

“When I joined my other company, I had a nice friendly email welcoming me on board and my new boss was in touch and they told me what to expect. I’ve had none of that from this company and it’s making me quite nervous and starting to make me question my decision. I’m wondering if there might be a problem and I’m starting to think – are they serious about me? are they expecting me? am I going to get a call any minute saying the job’s off? And it’s making me nervous. And it’s also making me think that they’re not that professional, not that caring and not that organised. So, I’m wondering if really I should keep my options open and whether I’m really making the right decision”.

Job offers are like buses, you get one and another one comes straight after

And sure enough, job offers are like buses, once you’ve got one, you find out there are loads of others, and if your new hire is uncertain about you as their new employer because you’ve not kept them engaged after the offer, you can pretty much guarantee there will be a more attractive option come knocking at their door, and they will have no problem letting you know they are going somewhere else.

Retention begins at the offer

The message here is that retaining your staff actually begins when you make the offer and there are lots of things that you can do, lots of actions that you can take, that don’t cost any money, just small gestures that make a big difference and they will minimise the risk of losing your new hire to another company before they have even started!

Coming soon -look out for our next blog on our top 10 tips of various ways you can stay in regular touch with your new hire during their notice period.

This subject means such a lot to us that we have written a white paper on how to retain your staff and this is just the first thing that is covered in detail. To receive your copy please click here or comment on our Vlog here to request your copy.


If you need help with your recruitment please get in touch:

Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk

Phone: 01189 680831

Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn





Why do some companies allow themselves to lose their new hire before they have even had their first day? What causes this to happen?

“I’ve accepted a job but I’m still open to offers”

We hear this every day from various candidates and the first question we ask is “why”?

And the reasons why are quite simple and they are really easy things that you can rectify as an employer in your quest to make sure that you retain your new hire, having spent lots of time, lots of money and lots of resources to find them.

So what is the reason?

The grass is always greener?

You might think the reason is because people might be greedy, always looking out for a better offer, with a ‘grass is always greener’ kind of attitude. Or you might think that some people just want to mess companies or recruiters around.

Well actually, this isn’t the case, not in my experience.

“I’ve not heard a thing since I was offered the job”

There is one big reason that is a huge factor in people still continuing to keep their options open and hear about other job opportunities. And that is the fact that they have had zero or very limited communication from their new employer since they were offered the job. Nothing. Zero. Not a dicky bird.

The answer to the “why?” question from earlier is often that the candidate hasn’t heard a thing from their new employer since the job offer. The contract took ages to come through, they haven’t seen their boss since the first interview because he wasn’t even in the 2nd one.

“It’s making me nervous”

A candidate I spoke to recently said -

“When I joined my other company, I had a nice friendly email welcoming me on board and my new boss was in touch and they told me what to expect. I’ve had none of that from this company and it’s making me quite nervous and starting to make me question my decision. I’m wondering if there might be a problem and I’m starting to think – are they serious about me? are they expecting me? am I going to get a call any minute saying the job’s off? And it’s making me nervous. And it’s also making me think that they’re not that professional, not that caring and not that organised. So, I’m wondering if really I should keep my options open and whether I’m really making the right decision”.

Job offers are like buses, you get one and another one comes straight after

And sure enough, job offers are like buses, once you’ve got one, you find out there are loads of others, and if your new hire is uncertain about you as their new employer because you’ve not kept them engaged after the offer, you can pretty much guarantee there will be a more attractive option come knocking at their door, and they will have no problem letting you know they are going somewhere else.

Retention begins at the offer

The message here is that retaining your staff actually begins when you make the offer and there are lots of things that you can do, lots of actions that you can take, that don’t cost any money, just small gestures that make a big difference and they will minimise the risk of losing your new hire to another company before they have even started!

Coming soon -look out for our next blog on our top 10 tips of various ways you can stay in regular touch with your new hire during their notice period.

This subject means such a lot to us that we have written a white paper on how to retain your staff and this is just the first thing that is covered in detail. To receive your copy please click here or comment on our Vlog here to request your copy.


If you need help with your recruitment please get in touch:

Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk

Phone: 01189 680831

Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn
Read More »

Thursday, 5 July 2018

You’re Hired! 5 reasons why you need to start thinking about employee retention NOW!


So you’ve just had a successful interview and hired a new employee. Congratulations! Time to put your feet up now and wait for them to start doing a good job?

NO!

Now you have to keep them! 

Here are 5 reasons why employee retention should be on your mind from the moment you say “you’re hired”!

1. Your employees are one of your most valuable assets

Managing your employees can be one of the most important and challenging parts of your job and managing them well can be the key to keeping them in your business.

2. Employee motivation is key

Your number one customers should be your people. Employee motivation is so important and is key to retention. Without motivation in their workplace, your employees will start to look elsewhere for somewhere that they will be motivated to stay put.

3. Save yourself time and money

Think about it, the recruitment process takes time and effort. Even with the help of a recruiter, it is still your job as the hiring manager to choose people to interview and carry out the interviews and ultimately make the final decision. If you end up losing your new hire because you didn’t think about the importance of retention, then you have to start that process all over again, costing you more time and money. Get it right the first time!

4. New employees are more likely to leave

Just as you will spend your first 6 months deciding whether your new hire is working well they are also assessing whether they want to work for your company long term. If you take a bit of time and put in some effort with a good onboarding and training process, great management and open feedback, then you are taking the right steps towards retaining your new hire.

5. It doesn’t end at the offer – beware of other offers

This can be one of the most difficult times in the hiring process – the gap between them accepting your offer and their first day working for you. At this stage they don’t have the loyalty that a long term employee has and they don’t yet have their official contract in place. At any point a better offer could come along and they could accept. That’s why it’s so important that you start thinking about retention from the offset. Make sure your new hire is motivated by your company and your job before they even start day one. Nobody wants their dream candidate to pull out of the role or worse still, a no-show on the first day. Keep the lines of communication open in this time, keep them motivated and engaged during their notice period and it will be harder for them to walk away from your offer if something ‘better’ comes along.

We take recruitment and retention very seriously, so seriously that we have written our very own guide to retaining your staff. It’s a comprehensive guide on the cycle to a new employee and actions you can take to ensure that you’re not another company that turns over their new staff member in their first year.

If you would like a FREE copy of this you can email us to request – info@louisafleet.co.uk 
or you can click here - https://bit.ly/2zoapR1

Or take a look at our Vlog on this subject here and put a simple “yes please” in the comments and we can arrange to get an email copy sent to you.

Want more recruitment advice? Find us on social media:
Facebook | LinkedIn | Twitter
Or give us a call on 01189 680831

So you’ve just had a successful interview and hired a new employee. Congratulations! Time to put your feet up now and wait for them to start doing a good job?

NO!

Now you have to keep them! 

Here are 5 reasons why employee retention should be on your mind from the moment you say “you’re hired”!

1. Your employees are one of your most valuable assets

Managing your employees can be one of the most important and challenging parts of your job and managing them well can be the key to keeping them in your business.

2. Employee motivation is key

Your number one customers should be your people. Employee motivation is so important and is key to retention. Without motivation in their workplace, your employees will start to look elsewhere for somewhere that they will be motivated to stay put.

3. Save yourself time and money

Think about it, the recruitment process takes time and effort. Even with the help of a recruiter, it is still your job as the hiring manager to choose people to interview and carry out the interviews and ultimately make the final decision. If you end up losing your new hire because you didn’t think about the importance of retention, then you have to start that process all over again, costing you more time and money. Get it right the first time!

4. New employees are more likely to leave

Just as you will spend your first 6 months deciding whether your new hire is working well they are also assessing whether they want to work for your company long term. If you take a bit of time and put in some effort with a good onboarding and training process, great management and open feedback, then you are taking the right steps towards retaining your new hire.

5. It doesn’t end at the offer – beware of other offers

This can be one of the most difficult times in the hiring process – the gap between them accepting your offer and their first day working for you. At this stage they don’t have the loyalty that a long term employee has and they don’t yet have their official contract in place. At any point a better offer could come along and they could accept. That’s why it’s so important that you start thinking about retention from the offset. Make sure your new hire is motivated by your company and your job before they even start day one. Nobody wants their dream candidate to pull out of the role or worse still, a no-show on the first day. Keep the lines of communication open in this time, keep them motivated and engaged during their notice period and it will be harder for them to walk away from your offer if something ‘better’ comes along.

We take recruitment and retention very seriously, so seriously that we have written our very own guide to retaining your staff. It’s a comprehensive guide on the cycle to a new employee and actions you can take to ensure that you’re not another company that turns over their new staff member in their first year.

If you would like a FREE copy of this you can email us to request – info@louisafleet.co.uk 
or you can click here - https://bit.ly/2zoapR1

Or take a look at our Vlog on this subject here and put a simple “yes please” in the comments and we can arrange to get an email copy sent to you.

Want more recruitment advice? Find us on social media:
Facebook | LinkedIn | Twitter
Or give us a call on 01189 680831
Read More »

Thursday, 10 May 2018

Informal Interviews - 3 things you should know



Informal interviews - we’ve touched on this subject before in our post titled “Tie or no Tie”. It’s such a minefield that we thought it deserved its own blog post!

So…Is there any such thing as an informal interview?

Hiring managers - we would warn you that the word ‘informal’ can easily be misinterpreted by candidates. We would recommend thinking carefully before describing your interview as an “informal” one.
As a hiring manager you might feel it puts the candidate more at ease and less under pressure. However, the word “informal “can mean different things to different people and this could end up being a disappointment and a waste of time for all parties involved and it can be easily avoided.

3 things to consider:

1. Interviews shouldn’t be “surprises”

That is unless you really are trying to see how your interviewee acts under pressure. If you choose an “informal” interview process makes sure you are clear on what you mean by this. A client of mine recently said “tell him (we will call the candidate Bob) it’s an informal interview, Bob doesn’t need to wear a tie, I won’t be wearing one, I want him to feel at ease” I’m so glad that I went on to ask “so what should else should I tell Bob to expect? “Because he went on to say that he “wants Bob to be as comfortable as possible as he would be going through his CV in some detail and this could take up to an hour and a half because we have some online tests to do whilst he is here”.  Now this extra piece of information gave a whole new meaning to the interview and Bob knew that the only thing that was informal about this interview was the fact he needn’t wear a tie and he could prepare accordingly. Everyone involved would have been embarrassed if Bob had turned up in his jeans, a shirt and a set of car keys, expecting just a “chat” purely because he had misunderstood the meaning of “informal”
So, if you have a specific expectations , please be clear with the recruiter and the candidate!

2.Decide on your objectives for your “informal” interview

As hiring manager, you may prefer an informal approach or setting and hopefully you know what you want to say, what you want to ask, and what information you want to have found out by the end of the interview. If you need to assess skills and experience make sure you have some well-prepared questions that will allow you to do this (we have some great starting points for sales interview questions here). An informal setting such as a hotel lounge or break out area can be a great place for a candidate to feel more at ease and be more open about their background and current situation. But make sure if it’s important to you that you don’t come away using only your gut feeling to decide, as this can result in you hiring someone with no evidence of their actual capabilities of doing the job and you will inevitably lose this person (either you sack them or they leave) because of this.

3. Clarify your own internal interview process

If you are inviting a candidate for a 2nd interview to meet your boss and it’s the 1st time, and they describe the interview as “informal” make sure you take the time to ask what they mean by this so you aren’t setting up the person you want to hire for a fall. There is nothing worse than having to reject your favourite potential employee as they walked in expecting a “friendly chat” and they actually got a grilling that they weren’t ready for.

Hiring Managers – be aware of the language you are using to invite candidates to interview. If you are asking them to attend an informal interview maybe give some extra guidelines on what they should expect from the process so they are well informed.

If you are looking to hire a candidate and would like some help please get in touch with us today on info@louisafleet.co.uk | 01189 680831

And come and find us on social media – Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn


Informal interviews - we’ve touched on this subject before in our post titled “Tie or no Tie”. It’s such a minefield that we thought it deserved its own blog post!

So…Is there any such thing as an informal interview?

Hiring managers - we would warn you that the word ‘informal’ can easily be misinterpreted by candidates. We would recommend thinking carefully before describing your interview as an “informal” one.
As a hiring manager you might feel it puts the candidate more at ease and less under pressure. However, the word “informal “can mean different things to different people and this could end up being a disappointment and a waste of time for all parties involved and it can be easily avoided.

3 things to consider:

1. Interviews shouldn’t be “surprises”

That is unless you really are trying to see how your interviewee acts under pressure. If you choose an “informal” interview process makes sure you are clear on what you mean by this. A client of mine recently said “tell him (we will call the candidate Bob) it’s an informal interview, Bob doesn’t need to wear a tie, I won’t be wearing one, I want him to feel at ease” I’m so glad that I went on to ask “so what should else should I tell Bob to expect? “Because he went on to say that he “wants Bob to be as comfortable as possible as he would be going through his CV in some detail and this could take up to an hour and a half because we have some online tests to do whilst he is here”.  Now this extra piece of information gave a whole new meaning to the interview and Bob knew that the only thing that was informal about this interview was the fact he needn’t wear a tie and he could prepare accordingly. Everyone involved would have been embarrassed if Bob had turned up in his jeans, a shirt and a set of car keys, expecting just a “chat” purely because he had misunderstood the meaning of “informal”
So, if you have a specific expectations , please be clear with the recruiter and the candidate!

2.Decide on your objectives for your “informal” interview

As hiring manager, you may prefer an informal approach or setting and hopefully you know what you want to say, what you want to ask, and what information you want to have found out by the end of the interview. If you need to assess skills and experience make sure you have some well-prepared questions that will allow you to do this (we have some great starting points for sales interview questions here). An informal setting such as a hotel lounge or break out area can be a great place for a candidate to feel more at ease and be more open about their background and current situation. But make sure if it’s important to you that you don’t come away using only your gut feeling to decide, as this can result in you hiring someone with no evidence of their actual capabilities of doing the job and you will inevitably lose this person (either you sack them or they leave) because of this.

3. Clarify your own internal interview process

If you are inviting a candidate for a 2nd interview to meet your boss and it’s the 1st time, and they describe the interview as “informal” make sure you take the time to ask what they mean by this so you aren’t setting up the person you want to hire for a fall. There is nothing worse than having to reject your favourite potential employee as they walked in expecting a “friendly chat” and they actually got a grilling that they weren’t ready for.

Hiring Managers – be aware of the language you are using to invite candidates to interview. If you are asking them to attend an informal interview maybe give some extra guidelines on what they should expect from the process so they are well informed.

If you are looking to hire a candidate and would like some help please get in touch with us today on info@louisafleet.co.uk | 01189 680831

And come and find us on social media – Facebook | Twitter | LinkedIn
Read More »

Thursday, 19 April 2018

Tie or no tie?


Interview outfits – this can be such a difficult subject when you are the prospective candidate. One of the questions we are asked most often by candidates who get to interview stage – “is there anything particular I should wear?”

Tie or no tie? Formal or smart casual? Killer heels or comfy flat shoes?

All things we need to consider and it can depend on the brief you get from the hiring manager. Have you ever struggled to know how smart or how casual to dress for your interview? How do you make up your mind?

Struggling to decide what to wear? Here are our top tips to help you make up your own mind:

1. Ask your recruiter

Your recruiter is there to help you. A good recruiter will have done their homework – they will be in regular contact with the hiring manager, they will have spoken to them at length about their company, the culture, the team, the environment and they will more often than not, have visited the offices themselves. And if they don’t know, ask them to find out – it’s their job!

Once you’ve asked your recruiter, take their advice! If you need help finding a recruiter, see our blog on the tell-tale signs of a top recruiter.

2. Remember you’ve only got one chance to make a good impression

Yes we know it’s not all about what you wear, but you do only get one chance to make a good impression, so it’s important to make an effort here! This isn’t the time to experiment with rainbow colours and loud patterns. Smart, polished and professional is what we’re going for here. Even in an ‘informal interview’ you need to create a good impression!

3. Informal Interview

Is there any such thing as an informal interview?

WARNING!! This can easily be mis-perceived!

In our opinion there is no such thing as an informal interview. Even if the client tells you that, we would still recommend that you treat it as a formal interview. Our advice would be don’t turn up in anything less than formal dress unless you are specifically told not to! Informal interview doesn’t automatically mean casual or business casual.

Even though some companies don’t expect employees to wear ties to work these days it should be noted that it is still widely expected for a candidate to be fully suited and booted (including jacket and tie, even on a hot summer day) for an interview unless specifically told otherwise. Don’t take the risk! It’s not the day for shorts and t-shirt or the old pair of jeans you found at the bottom of the wardrobe! You don’t want to be ‘that candidate that turned up in trainers’ or the candidate that wore ‘that’ jacket! Don’t be remembered for the wrong reasons!

If you’re not sure it’s always better to go over-dressed than the other way round! It’s easier to take your tie off than have to go home to change into your suit!

How do you decide what to wear to an interview? Do you always buy something new? Do you have a ‘lucky’ interview outfit?

If you’re looking for some top recruitment advice or you need help finding your next job please get in touch with us by:

Emailing – info@louisafleet.co.uk
Phone – 01189 680830
Social Media – LinkedIn | Facebook | Twitter


Interview outfits – this can be such a difficult subject when you are the prospective candidate. One of the questions we are asked most often by candidates who get to interview stage – “is there anything particular I should wear?”

Tie or no tie? Formal or smart casual? Killer heels or comfy flat shoes?

All things we need to consider and it can depend on the brief you get from the hiring manager. Have you ever struggled to know how smart or how casual to dress for your interview? How do you make up your mind?

Struggling to decide what to wear? Here are our top tips to help you make up your own mind:

1. Ask your recruiter

Your recruiter is there to help you. A good recruiter will have done their homework – they will be in regular contact with the hiring manager, they will have spoken to them at length about their company, the culture, the team, the environment and they will more often than not, have visited the offices themselves. And if they don’t know, ask them to find out – it’s their job!

Once you’ve asked your recruiter, take their advice! If you need help finding a recruiter, see our blog on the tell-tale signs of a top recruiter.

2. Remember you’ve only got one chance to make a good impression

Yes we know it’s not all about what you wear, but you do only get one chance to make a good impression, so it’s important to make an effort here! This isn’t the time to experiment with rainbow colours and loud patterns. Smart, polished and professional is what we’re going for here. Even in an ‘informal interview’ you need to create a good impression!

3. Informal Interview

Is there any such thing as an informal interview?

WARNING!! This can easily be mis-perceived!

In our opinion there is no such thing as an informal interview. Even if the client tells you that, we would still recommend that you treat it as a formal interview. Our advice would be don’t turn up in anything less than formal dress unless you are specifically told not to! Informal interview doesn’t automatically mean casual or business casual.

Even though some companies don’t expect employees to wear ties to work these days it should be noted that it is still widely expected for a candidate to be fully suited and booted (including jacket and tie, even on a hot summer day) for an interview unless specifically told otherwise. Don’t take the risk! It’s not the day for shorts and t-shirt or the old pair of jeans you found at the bottom of the wardrobe! You don’t want to be ‘that candidate that turned up in trainers’ or the candidate that wore ‘that’ jacket! Don’t be remembered for the wrong reasons!

If you’re not sure it’s always better to go over-dressed than the other way round! It’s easier to take your tie off than have to go home to change into your suit!

How do you decide what to wear to an interview? Do you always buy something new? Do you have a ‘lucky’ interview outfit?

If you’re looking for some top recruitment advice or you need help finding your next job please get in touch with us by:

Emailing – info@louisafleet.co.uk
Phone – 01189 680830
Social Media – LinkedIn | Facebook | Twitter

Read More »