Monday, 23 March 2020

Open for Business



That was certainly a tough week for everyone. I can’t remember when we last had such a bumpy ride, but the good news is we made it to Friday! Like everyone I’ve been doing a lot of thinking so I thought I’d share some of my learning and experiences that have helped me make it through the last week.


One day at a time

I’m just taking each day as it comes to stop myself feeling overwhelmed! I’ve been leaving space in my diary for the unexpected, events are changing daily and I need to have the capacity to react when necessary. I’m prioritising activities I can control and accept those that I can’t. This is really helping to lift my energy and mood and give me some sense of accomplishment on a daily basis.
We need to see people, face to face
The importance of face to face communication with my team even though we are remote is really showing. I’ve been scheduling regular video meetings to update and keep track of goals and individual personal situations. We are all fighting our own battles and it is helpful to share so we can support and advise each other as a team. These video meetings might even be a habit I keep up when social distancing is lifted!


Thinking of a victorious outcome

Overall, I’m visualising coming out of the other side of this – with continual reminders to myself that it is temporary. I’m convinced this experience will show us how resilient we are as a team and how much stronger our business will be as a result. We are celebrating each milestone and victory, however small.  I think if we create positive energies this encourages us to keep persisting and moving forward with confidence that good things can still happen.
I think the virus is an opportunity for the world to refocus on what matters. We are so busy we forget to appreciate what really gives our lives meaning. The people in our lives – family, colleagues, friends, neighbours and loved ones cannot be replaced.


Helping others makes you feel great 

I’m trying to make time to offer to help others in this crisis – asking where I can personally help a client which has been welcomed so far. I’ve set up a free CV Clinic to help Reading based hospitality staff promote their transferable skills into different sectors. These people need all the help they can get right now. You can get in touch via cvclinic@louisafleet.co.uk
Making a positive contribution and assisting others in the business community helps me feel like I’ve accomplished something.
Compassion is so important at this time – that may mean offering to help that man screaming in the toilet roll aisle rather than shouting at him. Like I said earlier, we are all fighting our own battles.


You can’t beat a bit of fresh air and gratitude 

It’s easy to neglect yourself in these situations but there is no sick pay when you run your own business and no basic salary to fall back on if the business grinds to a halt so I’ve been really paying attention to healthy eating, exercise, and sleep.
Getting out in the fresh air is really important for me and thankfully our wonderful office dog Billy makes sure I take him out twice a day!
I highly recommend a daily gratitude journal. It's a bit like counting your blessings morning and evening and it really lifts my spirits. I reflect on things that I am grateful for; things that make me smile; people who I am thankful for, something that made me laugh. There is always good in every day and it’s great to reflect and record this.


Open for business

Seeing our clients push on with hiring as usual where possible gives us hope for some business continuity and we are doing the same. It’s not surprising that companies involved in on-line supply and the domestic and health services sector are reporting a hike in recruitment requirements. They’ve got increasing demands that they can’t cope with. Our clients are looking to the future and are conscious of needing to maintain capacity for when the crisis is over. They are planning their recruitment carefully and nearby start dates are still going ahead. We are all adapting to the government advice and behaving responsibly around social distancing. Telephone and video interviews are the perfect solution for hiring managers who are adapting their processes so they can still move quickly to secure their ideal candidates. (I wrote a blog post about video interviews here)
So, in summary, we are standing strong, open for business and ready to serve!

If you are recruiting or looking for a job please do get in touch sales@louisafleet.co.uk
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Wednesday, 18 March 2020

Video Interviewing





1. What questions are asked in a video interview?


Like in all kinds of interviews, questions are relevant to the job, the function and the seniority level. They also have to do with the hiring stage. For example, first-round interviews usually cover basic topics such as availability and salary expectations, while interviews at later stages might address career goals and projects that candidates will manage if hired.

The same guidelines apply in video interviews. Since it’s common to have a video call early in the hiring process, as a screening method, here are some common video interview questions you can ask:


⦁  What attracted you to sales? Why did you decide to apply for this sales role?
⦁  Tell me about a sale you are most proud of and why?
⦁  What inspired you to pursue this type of sales career?
⦁  Describe briefly a sales objection you faced and how you overcame it.
⦁  What does a good week look like to you, sales activity wise?
⦁  What do you want from your next employer and line manager, tell me your “must haves” and “nice to haves”?

For more video interview tips, have a look at these online interview questions and Skype interview questions. Here are also some sample video interview questions and answers specifically for remote employees.

2. How do I prepare myself for a video interview?


Besides having the proper video equipment (camera, mic, software, etc.), interviewers need to ensure that video calls go as smoothly as possible. Here are some tips to prepare yourself before a video interview with candidates:

For live video interviews:

⦁  Be ready 20 minutes before each call to test your equipment.  We recommend Zoom or Skype (https://zoom.us/ https://www.skype.com/en/) Even if you’ve used them before, unexpected issues could arise at any moment. It’s useful to have the candidate’s contact details handy in case you need to inform them about a delay
⦁  Make sure they have clear instructions on how to receive the call their end.
⦁  Pick a room that’s free of distractions. Good lighting, privacy and a de-cluttered background are also essential. Make sure to mute any notifications you have on your computer (e.g. email, Slack) so that you stay focused on your interview.
⦁  Keep in mind that video interviews can be stressful for candidates considering they’re basically talking to a screen. Help them feel more comfortable by maintaining eye contact and showing that they have your full attention. For example, if you’re making video calls with your phone, it might seem you’re in a rush. Plus, the fact that when you’re holding your phone, the screen is not stable and could distract candidates.

3. What are some disadvantages of video interviews – and what can I do about them?


While video interviews can benefit your hiring process, you should also consider the following potential risks:

Poor evaluation due to technical difficulties

No matter how well-prepared you and the candidate are, something could always go wrong (e.g. poor connection or a temporary malfunction of the camera.) These technical issues can hinder the flow of conversation and may be stressful for candidates.
Tip: if you face technical difficulties during an interview, don’t be too harsh on candidates. Also, consider having a quick follow-up if you didn’t have the chance to discuss everything during your call.


Personality bias
While video interviews help you structure your hiring process, and therefore be more objective, they can also introduce new biases. Think of how interviewers can be influenced by a nice-sounding voice or a confident attitude. These characteristics may be job-related if we’re talking about a sales role or customer-facing position, but they could subconsciously (and wrongfully) be used as criteria for other roles, too.

Source- resources.workable.com



Get in touch with one of the team today:


Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk
Social Media: LinkedIn Twitter | Facebook | Instagram |






1. What questions are asked in a video interview?


Like in all kinds of interviews, questions are relevant to the job, the function and the seniority level. They also have to do with the hiring stage. For example, first-round interviews usually cover basic topics such as availability and salary expectations, while interviews at later stages might address career goals and projects that candidates will manage if hired.

The same guidelines apply in video interviews. Since it’s common to have a video call early in the hiring process, as a screening method, here are some common video interview questions you can ask:


⦁  What attracted you to sales? Why did you decide to apply for this sales role?
⦁  Tell me about a sale you are most proud of and why?
⦁  What inspired you to pursue this type of sales career?
⦁  Describe briefly a sales objection you faced and how you overcame it.
⦁  What does a good week look like to you, sales activity wise?
⦁  What do you want from your next employer and line manager, tell me your “must haves” and “nice to haves”?

For more video interview tips, have a look at these online interview questions and Skype interview questions. Here are also some sample video interview questions and answers specifically for remote employees.

2. How do I prepare myself for a video interview?


Besides having the proper video equipment (camera, mic, software, etc.), interviewers need to ensure that video calls go as smoothly as possible. Here are some tips to prepare yourself before a video interview with candidates:

For live video interviews:

⦁  Be ready 20 minutes before each call to test your equipment.  We recommend Zoom or Skype (https://zoom.us/ https://www.skype.com/en/) Even if you’ve used them before, unexpected issues could arise at any moment. It’s useful to have the candidate’s contact details handy in case you need to inform them about a delay
⦁  Make sure they have clear instructions on how to receive the call their end.
⦁  Pick a room that’s free of distractions. Good lighting, privacy and a de-cluttered background are also essential. Make sure to mute any notifications you have on your computer (e.g. email, Slack) so that you stay focused on your interview.
⦁  Keep in mind that video interviews can be stressful for candidates considering they’re basically talking to a screen. Help them feel more comfortable by maintaining eye contact and showing that they have your full attention. For example, if you’re making video calls with your phone, it might seem you’re in a rush. Plus, the fact that when you’re holding your phone, the screen is not stable and could distract candidates.

3. What are some disadvantages of video interviews – and what can I do about them?


While video interviews can benefit your hiring process, you should also consider the following potential risks:

Poor evaluation due to technical difficulties

No matter how well-prepared you and the candidate are, something could always go wrong (e.g. poor connection or a temporary malfunction of the camera.) These technical issues can hinder the flow of conversation and may be stressful for candidates.
Tip: if you face technical difficulties during an interview, don’t be too harsh on candidates. Also, consider having a quick follow-up if you didn’t have the chance to discuss everything during your call.


Personality bias
While video interviews help you structure your hiring process, and therefore be more objective, they can also introduce new biases. Think of how interviewers can be influenced by a nice-sounding voice or a confident attitude. These characteristics may be job-related if we’re talking about a sales role or customer-facing position, but they could subconsciously (and wrongfully) be used as criteria for other roles, too.

Source- resources.workable.com



Get in touch with one of the team today:


Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk
Social Media: LinkedIn Twitter | Facebook | Instagram |


Read More »

Tuesday, 10 March 2020

5 Reasons to be Socially Responsible




The idea of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is not new – the idea that companies should give back to their communities started in the Victorian era with companies like Cadbury keen to demonstrate their social worth as well as their ability to make profits. But why should you take on this responsibility?

Here are 5 good reasons …


Gain credibility as an employer

The ideas slowly gained credibility through the 1990s until they gained renewed prominence with examples of corporate scandals such as ENRON, the financial crash and growing awareness of impending ecological crisis bringing the behaviour of companies into the limelight. So don’t be shy about doing the right thing – it’s an important way of demonstrating you care about the long term consequences of what you do and are invested in the community you are a part of.


Showcase your values

An article in the Harvard Business Review describes CSR as a way to ‘align a company’s social and environmental activities with its business purpose and values’.  We think this is a great way of looking at it. How you approach CSR has to fit your company – each business will face different challenges depending on the industry you are in, the size of your company and the kind of product or service you provide. Values are important to prospective employees who demonstrate integrity and commitment – they want to be part of a venture that behaves ethically.


Increase your profits

There are also different approaches you can take to your CSR – companies we work with tend to combine different elements that work best for their company and community.  Sustainable and ecological initiatives should be high up on your list – we get many candidates who tell us they only want to work for companies that take their environmental responsibilities seriously. You may also find that initiatives to reduce your use of resources, cut waste, etc. will also have a beneficial effect on your profits – which is never a bad thing!  Not only that, a profitable business is attractive to new hires as it helps them feel secure about their future – if you change companies you don’t want to join a sinking ship!


It’s a USP your sales force can promote

Philanthropy can be a way to do more than giving money or raising cash through sponsorships – doing a clean-up in a local park can be a great team-building exercise for your staff and also help their wellbeing.  Ask your team for any ideas they would like to put forward. This can make for great PR if you spread the word on your social media! It can also make a nice conversational topic for sales reps targeting that business community.
As a side benefit, it has been proved that companies working hard at their CSR often find that productivity increases alongside their reputation. This can then translate into increased customer loyalty and trust – this is great news for sales teams! Sales people love to have something unique to say about the company they are selling, it really helps them with their pitch – and helps them believe in what they are selling.


Reduce your annual quit rate and attract great candidates

Research has also discovered that the best companies for CSR also managed to reduce their annual quit rate by 3% - which amounted to a 25-30% reduction compared to companies without active CSR measures. That’s a great benefit to the bottom line!  Not only that but having a reputation for great CSR helps to attract more applicants – we’ve seen this ourselves.


Get in touch with one of the team today:

Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk







The idea of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is not new – the idea that companies should give back to their communities started in the Victorian era with companies like Cadbury keen to demonstrate their social worth as well as their ability to make profits. But why should you take on this responsibility?

Here are 5 good reasons …


Gain credibility as an employer

The ideas slowly gained credibility through the 1990s until they gained renewed prominence with examples of corporate scandals such as ENRON, the financial crash and growing awareness of impending ecological crisis bringing the behaviour of companies into the limelight. So don’t be shy about doing the right thing – it’s an important way of demonstrating you care about the long term consequences of what you do and are invested in the community you are a part of.


Showcase your values

An article in the Harvard Business Review describes CSR as a way to ‘align a company’s social and environmental activities with its business purpose and values’.  We think this is a great way of looking at it. How you approach CSR has to fit your company – each business will face different challenges depending on the industry you are in, the size of your company and the kind of product or service you provide. Values are important to prospective employees who demonstrate integrity and commitment – they want to be part of a venture that behaves ethically.


Increase your profits

There are also different approaches you can take to your CSR – companies we work with tend to combine different elements that work best for their company and community.  Sustainable and ecological initiatives should be high up on your list – we get many candidates who tell us they only want to work for companies that take their environmental responsibilities seriously. You may also find that initiatives to reduce your use of resources, cut waste, etc. will also have a beneficial effect on your profits – which is never a bad thing!  Not only that, a profitable business is attractive to new hires as it helps them feel secure about their future – if you change companies you don’t want to join a sinking ship!


It’s a USP your sales force can promote

Philanthropy can be a way to do more than giving money or raising cash through sponsorships – doing a clean-up in a local park can be a great team-building exercise for your staff and also help their wellbeing.  Ask your team for any ideas they would like to put forward. This can make for great PR if you spread the word on your social media! It can also make a nice conversational topic for sales reps targeting that business community.
As a side benefit, it has been proved that companies working hard at their CSR often find that productivity increases alongside their reputation. This can then translate into increased customer loyalty and trust – this is great news for sales teams! Sales people love to have something unique to say about the company they are selling, it really helps them with their pitch – and helps them believe in what they are selling.


Reduce your annual quit rate and attract great candidates

Research has also discovered that the best companies for CSR also managed to reduce their annual quit rate by 3% - which amounted to a 25-30% reduction compared to companies without active CSR measures. That’s a great benefit to the bottom line!  Not only that but having a reputation for great CSR helps to attract more applicants – we’ve seen this ourselves.


Get in touch with one of the team today:

Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk




Read More »

Thursday, 27 February 2020

7 Reasons why it's your fault your new hire takes so long to learn




Ever wondered why your new staff  “just don’t get it?"

Ever heard yourself saying that “these new hires just don’t seem to have the initiative, they don’t listen to simple instructions” and they “don’t follow the advice that’s been given”
“It’s not rocket science! It’s all there written down. We have a process for everything!”

Consider these harsh facts that probably apply to your business.

Only your really experienced staff actually know every step in your business process
(Stan who started in the warehouse when he was 18, has been promoted many times and now is the service manager) “There is nothing Stan doesn’t know about your business”

Every depot in the UK (there are 10) relies upon their equivalent, Stan ...
1. All the “Stan's” in the business are close to retirement
2. You rely on all the “Stan's” and his subordinates to show your new starters your business processes and then they are expected to be able to “just get on with it”
3. You think you have a great written process but it has gaping holes in it that make it impossible for a new person to follow - they have to “go and ask Stan”
4. Your process isn’t a process, it’s a checklist - vague bullet points put together by Stan
5. When a relevant question is asked, the answer is…
“Oh yes, good point, it doesn’t detail it in the process document but “ask Stan - he knows”
6. Your process is full of company jargon which needs extra explanation unless you are “Stan” or a “Stan equivalent”
7. Even all the Stan equivalents follow different processes and use different terminology for the same activity

If this sounds like your business then how can you blame your staff for “not getting it”.

Perhaps it’s about time you took a long hard look at your business processes.
Save yourself time, money and hassle by creating a uniform process that is easy to understand for new starters, long term staff and get everyone on the same page.

I did the first step of this with the business process experts Libreea.
It turns out my 10-step process to the untrained eye was actually 58 steps.
How on earth should I expect a new hire to “get” those missing 48 steps?.

Don’t blame your new starters, or the recruiters or the hiring managers for making a wrong decision.
Take a look at your processes and save yourself time and money on turning over the staff that “just don’t get it”

If these sound-like familiar issues to you and for your business Libreea are experts in business processes and will provide advice and guidance on all business processes - visit www.libreea.co.uk Or If you’d like a personal introduction to this dedicated team of experts please just let me know.

Get in touch with one of the team today:

Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk





Ever wondered why your new staff  “just don’t get it?"

Ever heard yourself saying that “these new hires just don’t seem to have the initiative, they don’t listen to simple instructions” and they “don’t follow the advice that’s been given”
“It’s not rocket science! It’s all there written down. We have a process for everything!”

Consider these harsh facts that probably apply to your business.

Only your really experienced staff actually know every step in your business process
(Stan who started in the warehouse when he was 18, has been promoted many times and now is the service manager) “There is nothing Stan doesn’t know about your business”

Every depot in the UK (there are 10) relies upon their equivalent, Stan ...
1. All the “Stan's” in the business are close to retirement
2. You rely on all the “Stan's” and his subordinates to show your new starters your business processes and then they are expected to be able to “just get on with it”
3. You think you have a great written process but it has gaping holes in it that make it impossible for a new person to follow - they have to “go and ask Stan”
4. Your process isn’t a process, it’s a checklist - vague bullet points put together by Stan
5. When a relevant question is asked, the answer is…
“Oh yes, good point, it doesn’t detail it in the process document but “ask Stan - he knows”
6. Your process is full of company jargon which needs extra explanation unless you are “Stan” or a “Stan equivalent”
7. Even all the Stan equivalents follow different processes and use different terminology for the same activity

If this sounds like your business then how can you blame your staff for “not getting it”.

Perhaps it’s about time you took a long hard look at your business processes.
Save yourself time, money and hassle by creating a uniform process that is easy to understand for new starters, long term staff and get everyone on the same page.

I did the first step of this with the business process experts Libreea.
It turns out my 10-step process to the untrained eye was actually 58 steps.
How on earth should I expect a new hire to “get” those missing 48 steps?.

Don’t blame your new starters, or the recruiters or the hiring managers for making a wrong decision.
Take a look at your processes and save yourself time and money on turning over the staff that “just don’t get it”

If these sound-like familiar issues to you and for your business Libreea are experts in business processes and will provide advice and guidance on all business processes - visit www.libreea.co.uk Or If you’d like a personal introduction to this dedicated team of experts please just let me know.

Get in touch with one of the team today:

Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk


Read More »

Wednesday, 26 February 2020

Returning to work after raising children





In my time “away” from the office my life changed in so many ways. I had a great career for a major blue chip telecoms company for 11 years, so the decision to leave and become a full time mum didn't come easily.

I was however then lucky enough to take 5 years out and raise my youngest child who is now 5 and recently started school. He was at nursery part time for two of those years so I did something I’d never done - joined the local gym. It was here things really started to change for me. I developed a passion for fitness and made a fantastic new group of friends one of whom asked me last year if I wanted to help her with ad hoc administration. I was reluctant, I was quite enjoying my life and I had really embraced being a full time mum.

I agreed to help for a few months to see how it suited everyone. I liked it, it fitted around parenting and, they seemed to be happy with me which is always a bonus. Once the three month trial was up my friend (now boss), asked if I’d consider joining the team once my son started school.

We had numerous discussions during our weekend runs. This really was a great time to talk however, I was nervous. Did I really understand what I was being asked, 5 years was a long time, things had moved on, I had moved on. I took a lot of time to think and had a couple of great meetings to discuss my options.

I have to say, I’ve been very lucky again - to find a boss and a company that still let me be a mum and fit my work around my children and the gym. I didn’t believe that type of flexibility & company existed.

I've been employed for nearly 5 months now and although sometimes overwhelming and there is a lot of juggling, I am enjoying it and it's going well.

Are you thinking about returning to work after a career break? Could we help you find your next job?

Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk








In my time “away” from the office my life changed in so many ways. I had a great career for a major blue chip telecoms company for 11 years, so the decision to leave and become a full time mum didn't come easily.

I was however then lucky enough to take 5 years out and raise my youngest child who is now 5 and recently started school. He was at nursery part time for two of those years so I did something I’d never done - joined the local gym. It was here things really started to change for me. I developed a passion for fitness and made a fantastic new group of friends one of whom asked me last year if I wanted to help her with ad hoc administration. I was reluctant, I was quite enjoying my life and I had really embraced being a full time mum.

I agreed to help for a few months to see how it suited everyone. I liked it, it fitted around parenting and, they seemed to be happy with me which is always a bonus. Once the three month trial was up my friend (now boss), asked if I’d consider joining the team once my son started school.

We had numerous discussions during our weekend runs. This really was a great time to talk however, I was nervous. Did I really understand what I was being asked, 5 years was a long time, things had moved on, I had moved on. I took a lot of time to think and had a couple of great meetings to discuss my options.

I have to say, I’ve been very lucky again - to find a boss and a company that still let me be a mum and fit my work around my children and the gym. I didn’t believe that type of flexibility & company existed.

I've been employed for nearly 5 months now and although sometimes overwhelming and there is a lot of juggling, I am enjoying it and it's going well.

Are you thinking about returning to work after a career break? Could we help you find your next job?

Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk




Read More »

Friday, 7 February 2020

Why LinkedIn is the place to attract your next salesperson.






In the B2B world, I think LinkedIn is the best platform to raise your employer profile with potential new hires, especially sales executives, as they use it all the time. LinkedIn gives you the chance to attract passive candidates by warming them up to your company as a great place to work so they are more likely to press “apply” if they see a role advertised with you. My team and I speak to hundreds of candidates every week and it’s a battle to convince them to consider roles for companies that don’t prioritise their employer brand in this way especially if you aren’t a well-known organisation.

Here are 3 steps you can take to get the ball rolling:


1. Make a plan.

LinkedIn will not grow organically. You need a plan! Allocate a staff member responsible for co-ordinating and implementing your social media goals going forward. This could be a great opportunity for an employee who is keen to develop new skills and who is interested in developing their creativity. They will need to schedule posts and articles and calendar events of what’s happening in your business and in your business community.


2. Create great content.

Think about your ‘voice’
Ok now it is time for the nitty-gritty – start making your content.  This is where it is important to show your corporate culture.  Be clear about the ‘voice’ that is going to be used in your posts. If you are interested in attracting great sales people make sure you are authentic and engaging.  A more informal, conversational voice tends to work well – people like to feel like they would be welcome in your company and that they can achieve their goals while enjoying their time at work.  So long as you take care to never cross the line from ‘informal’ to ‘inappropriate’ you should be fine!
Tell a story
Linked in is a great place to tell a story, so why not talk about how your company started.  You might want to post some images of your first premises or staff members on the anniversary of your company’s foundation and write about how you have developed in the interim. Whether that time has been 2 or 200 years there is a story to be told!

Talk about staff achievements
Sales people love public praise and recognition, this is why they are in sales! So, stroke their egos and shout about their greatness!  Good sales people want to work for companies that do this, so don’t be shy and don’t just wait until the annual awards - you can highlight a great week of outstanding sales results or a major customer win. Candidates will be really interested to see that you are proud of the people who work at your company.  In my opinion,   all new hires should be welcomed with a post – it shows you value them as part of your sales team.

Get your sales team involved.
Staff involvement will be really important so ask them to help you to get across the ‘vibe’ of your company.  Be open to suggestions and have a process where they can put forward their ideas – it might simply be a rolling deadline, for example, all ideas and pictures to be sent to Jenny by 5pm Monday.  Encourage your sales people to like, share and comment on posts to increase the reach of your content.

Staff spotlights.
Staff spotlights and interviews make great content.  A day in the life of a field sales representative or the office staff that support them can be fascinating and give a real insight into what it’s like to work for your company.

Boast about your corporate social responsibility.

We are finding that when faced with the option of several interviews, our candidates are increasingly choosing companies that share their personal values around the environment and social responsibility. Not only does this matter to them, they know that it matters to their clients and that it will give them a competitive edge when pitching. So, if you are a leader at recycling in your industry or you have fantastic community links in your area be sure to post about it regularly so your potential candidates can see.


3. Maximise your views.

Use images
Posts with images get twice as many comments in LinkedIn so document key events with photos and images that you can share. Pictures from conferences staff have attended, images of people doing their jobs, being successful and having fun or even phone pictures from the team meeting.
Images don’t always have to be professional, amateurish shots can sometimes appear more authentic and candid than posed, but make sure they are not blurry and that they are well-lit.
You can expect high engagement on pictures of recent training courses and high achiever awards. These always go down well as they involve many staff. New product launches show your innovation and add to this picture of you with your customers at the latest exhibition and you will never be short of content.

Don’t forget video

Video is an important tool – they get 3 times the engagement of text posts and people are 20 times more likely to share a video on LinkedIn.  It’s great to pull back the curtain and give people a behind the scenes look at your company via a tour of your facilities, or staff visiting customer sites for example.  Very short interviews with staff can work really well and can help highlight your team diversity.  Again, you don’t have to hire a professional video crew – phone footage or domestic video can be great these days but you need to make sure you capture the sound well enough to be heard.  Don’t be afraid to redo things several times to get it right and try to include closed captions on your video to ensure it is accessible and can be understood when people view it without sound.

Here is a great example video from Johnsons Stalbridge Linen Services
Johnsons Stalbridge Linen Services

Use your own profile
As well as having a company presence many of our clients at CEO or Sales Director level share company content and also post directly using their personal LinkedIn profiles – this helps increase the reach of the content and shows that you are human and in touch with your people.  When using your personal profile, it is important to make sure you get your profile up to an ‘All-Star’ status to get up to 40 times more contacts.
If you want to find out how to do this here is a useful guide:
https://blog.linkedin.com/2017/april/25/tuesday-tips-how-to-be-an-all-star-with-your-linkedin-profile

So, don’t be backward about coming forward on LinkedIn! Get posting about what an awesome company you are and see how it impacts your job application numbers.

Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk







In the B2B world, I think LinkedIn is the best platform to raise your employer profile with potential new hires, especially sales executives, as they use it all the time. LinkedIn gives you the chance to attract passive candidates by warming them up to your company as a great place to work so they are more likely to press “apply” if they see a role advertised with you. My team and I speak to hundreds of candidates every week and it’s a battle to convince them to consider roles for companies that don’t prioritise their employer brand in this way especially if you aren’t a well-known organisation.

Here are 3 steps you can take to get the ball rolling:


1. Make a plan.

LinkedIn will not grow organically. You need a plan! Allocate a staff member responsible for co-ordinating and implementing your social media goals going forward. This could be a great opportunity for an employee who is keen to develop new skills and who is interested in developing their creativity. They will need to schedule posts and articles and calendar events of what’s happening in your business and in your business community.


2. Create great content.

Think about your ‘voice’
Ok now it is time for the nitty-gritty – start making your content.  This is where it is important to show your corporate culture.  Be clear about the ‘voice’ that is going to be used in your posts. If you are interested in attracting great sales people make sure you are authentic and engaging.  A more informal, conversational voice tends to work well – people like to feel like they would be welcome in your company and that they can achieve their goals while enjoying their time at work.  So long as you take care to never cross the line from ‘informal’ to ‘inappropriate’ you should be fine!
Tell a story
Linked in is a great place to tell a story, so why not talk about how your company started.  You might want to post some images of your first premises or staff members on the anniversary of your company’s foundation and write about how you have developed in the interim. Whether that time has been 2 or 200 years there is a story to be told!

Talk about staff achievements
Sales people love public praise and recognition, this is why they are in sales! So, stroke their egos and shout about their greatness!  Good sales people want to work for companies that do this, so don’t be shy and don’t just wait until the annual awards - you can highlight a great week of outstanding sales results or a major customer win. Candidates will be really interested to see that you are proud of the people who work at your company.  In my opinion,   all new hires should be welcomed with a post – it shows you value them as part of your sales team.

Get your sales team involved.
Staff involvement will be really important so ask them to help you to get across the ‘vibe’ of your company.  Be open to suggestions and have a process where they can put forward their ideas – it might simply be a rolling deadline, for example, all ideas and pictures to be sent to Jenny by 5pm Monday.  Encourage your sales people to like, share and comment on posts to increase the reach of your content.

Staff spotlights.
Staff spotlights and interviews make great content.  A day in the life of a field sales representative or the office staff that support them can be fascinating and give a real insight into what it’s like to work for your company.

Boast about your corporate social responsibility.

We are finding that when faced with the option of several interviews, our candidates are increasingly choosing companies that share their personal values around the environment and social responsibility. Not only does this matter to them, they know that it matters to their clients and that it will give them a competitive edge when pitching. So, if you are a leader at recycling in your industry or you have fantastic community links in your area be sure to post about it regularly so your potential candidates can see.


3. Maximise your views.

Use images
Posts with images get twice as many comments in LinkedIn so document key events with photos and images that you can share. Pictures from conferences staff have attended, images of people doing their jobs, being successful and having fun or even phone pictures from the team meeting.
Images don’t always have to be professional, amateurish shots can sometimes appear more authentic and candid than posed, but make sure they are not blurry and that they are well-lit.
You can expect high engagement on pictures of recent training courses and high achiever awards. These always go down well as they involve many staff. New product launches show your innovation and add to this picture of you with your customers at the latest exhibition and you will never be short of content.

Don’t forget video

Video is an important tool – they get 3 times the engagement of text posts and people are 20 times more likely to share a video on LinkedIn.  It’s great to pull back the curtain and give people a behind the scenes look at your company via a tour of your facilities, or staff visiting customer sites for example.  Very short interviews with staff can work really well and can help highlight your team diversity.  Again, you don’t have to hire a professional video crew – phone footage or domestic video can be great these days but you need to make sure you capture the sound well enough to be heard.  Don’t be afraid to redo things several times to get it right and try to include closed captions on your video to ensure it is accessible and can be understood when people view it without sound.

Here is a great example video from Johnsons Stalbridge Linen Services
Johnsons Stalbridge Linen Services

Use your own profile
As well as having a company presence many of our clients at CEO or Sales Director level share company content and also post directly using their personal LinkedIn profiles – this helps increase the reach of the content and shows that you are human and in touch with your people.  When using your personal profile, it is important to make sure you get your profile up to an ‘All-Star’ status to get up to 40 times more contacts.
If you want to find out how to do this here is a useful guide:
https://blog.linkedin.com/2017/april/25/tuesday-tips-how-to-be-an-all-star-with-your-linkedin-profile

So, don’t be backward about coming forward on LinkedIn! Get posting about what an awesome company you are and see how it impacts your job application numbers.

Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk


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Thursday, 9 January 2020

4 Promises I am making this year





Every January I like to review my previous year and identify what has gone well and what could have been better. I review how my team and business have developed so I can plan for bigger and better things moving forward. Like most company owners and sales managers, I’m always striving for improvement.

So what happens when your sales team doesn’t achieve all you want? I personally like to think about why and take some responsibility for how I could have made a difference.
In my opinion, a good manager will not only critique the individuals that work for them but they’ll take a good look at themselves in the mirror too and as the saying goes- you are only as good as the worst person in your team.

If you are in this position how about asking yourself these questions:

  1. Were you the best version of yourself you could have been?
  2. Did you lead motivate and inspire the people that work for you so they could be the very best they could be?
  3. Were you as organised as you could be in attending to the things you needed to do
Be honest with your analysis – you can’t change what you don’t acknowledge so just face the truth and learn from it.

This leads us neatly on to the first of four promises

1. I will push myself outside my comfort zone

As sales managers we are really focussed on the day to day management of our teams and our own development needs can often get forgotten. The chances are you got to where you are today because you strived for more.
Take some time to think about your personal goals and ambitions. Are you stretching yourself or are you just coasting?
What goals have you got that will take you out of your comfort zone?
If you can’t think of any be warned- complacency will ultimately end in failure. Lifelong learning should be our default setting – the world is changing constantly and we need to refresh our skills to keep up.
Dare to dream – think of some personal goals and challenges. So you are ready to do a marathon – why not really go for it and run it on the Great Wall of China or through a safari park in Kenya! Goal orientated people are motivated people; it’s what you would ask of your sales team, so lead by example and be an inspiration to others. Ask them to get involved with you to take part in some challenging activities outside of work – things like mud runs, obstacle courses and escape rooms - these are great for team bonding.

2. I will offer useful information to help

On our business and the competition!
How good are you are keeping abreast of developments in your area of business, for example? Do you read the trade press as often as you should? Do you actively seek out trends in the industry to keep ahead of the competition? Whilst your salespeople are busy knocking doors and generating pipeline give them a helping hand by researching and sharing information that will give them a competitive advantage Make this a regular habit in your weekly schedule.
Communicate sales information that will be useful to your team. Which sectors are proving more profitable at the moment? What deals have been won in other locations that you could pitch for too. Share your CRM data with your team and they will be far more motivated to keep it up to date!
As part of your increased engagement habit, you might also want to think about making sure you are truly open to a two way dialogue. Your sales team will likely know more about the day to day trials and tribulations of their particular patch, so ask them for feedback and for their ideas to help others reach their sales goals.

3. I will engage with my team in a meaningful way

It’s all too easy for us to think we know our sales team after working with them for a while. We often generalise based on our experiences with them in the past but when was the last time you had a really good chat with your top performer? Or do you leave them to it as they know what they are doing?
Take the time to give every salesperson one-to-one attention and they will reward you for it. Regular field accompaniments will keep you in touch with the sharp end of the business and give your staff the opportunity to share more of themselves in the downtime between appointments.
Engaging with your sales staff often will ensure you are aware of their current motivations, drivers and goals. People’s lives change and this can lead to a change in behaviour and motivation which can lead to a dip in performance. By understanding our team’s personal circumstances, we are better placed to know how to manage and motivate. Offering a booze filled trip to the races as a sales incentive might not have much attraction for a new parent for instance but offering some extra leave might be incredibly effective, however!

4. I will model a positive mindset and offer to help!

Your team will pick-up on your stress levels so it is up to you to ensure that you are aware of your own state of mind and that you can have difficult conversations in an appropriate way. You have to be honest about team and individual performance, but the focus should be on what needs to be done to change things and how you believe that they are capable of doing what is necessary. Make suggestions but also ask how you can help – your staff will no doubt have ideas that will be useful.


Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk





Every January I like to review my previous year and identify what has gone well and what could have been better. I review how my team and business have developed so I can plan for bigger and better things moving forward. Like most company owners and sales managers, I’m always striving for improvement.

So what happens when your sales team doesn’t achieve all you want? I personally like to think about why and take some responsibility for how I could have made a difference.
In my opinion, a good manager will not only critique the individuals that work for them but they’ll take a good look at themselves in the mirror too and as the saying goes- you are only as good as the worst person in your team.

If you are in this position how about asking yourself these questions:

  1. Were you the best version of yourself you could have been?
  2. Did you lead motivate and inspire the people that work for you so they could be the very best they could be?
  3. Were you as organised as you could be in attending to the things you needed to do
Be honest with your analysis – you can’t change what you don’t acknowledge so just face the truth and learn from it.

This leads us neatly on to the first of four promises

1. I will push myself outside my comfort zone

As sales managers we are really focussed on the day to day management of our teams and our own development needs can often get forgotten. The chances are you got to where you are today because you strived for more.
Take some time to think about your personal goals and ambitions. Are you stretching yourself or are you just coasting?
What goals have you got that will take you out of your comfort zone?
If you can’t think of any be warned- complacency will ultimately end in failure. Lifelong learning should be our default setting – the world is changing constantly and we need to refresh our skills to keep up.
Dare to dream – think of some personal goals and challenges. So you are ready to do a marathon – why not really go for it and run it on the Great Wall of China or through a safari park in Kenya! Goal orientated people are motivated people; it’s what you would ask of your sales team, so lead by example and be an inspiration to others. Ask them to get involved with you to take part in some challenging activities outside of work – things like mud runs, obstacle courses and escape rooms - these are great for team bonding.

2. I will offer useful information to help

On our business and the competition!
How good are you are keeping abreast of developments in your area of business, for example? Do you read the trade press as often as you should? Do you actively seek out trends in the industry to keep ahead of the competition? Whilst your salespeople are busy knocking doors and generating pipeline give them a helping hand by researching and sharing information that will give them a competitive advantage Make this a regular habit in your weekly schedule.
Communicate sales information that will be useful to your team. Which sectors are proving more profitable at the moment? What deals have been won in other locations that you could pitch for too. Share your CRM data with your team and they will be far more motivated to keep it up to date!
As part of your increased engagement habit, you might also want to think about making sure you are truly open to a two way dialogue. Your sales team will likely know more about the day to day trials and tribulations of their particular patch, so ask them for feedback and for their ideas to help others reach their sales goals.

3. I will engage with my team in a meaningful way

It’s all too easy for us to think we know our sales team after working with them for a while. We often generalise based on our experiences with them in the past but when was the last time you had a really good chat with your top performer? Or do you leave them to it as they know what they are doing?
Take the time to give every salesperson one-to-one attention and they will reward you for it. Regular field accompaniments will keep you in touch with the sharp end of the business and give your staff the opportunity to share more of themselves in the downtime between appointments.
Engaging with your sales staff often will ensure you are aware of their current motivations, drivers and goals. People’s lives change and this can lead to a change in behaviour and motivation which can lead to a dip in performance. By understanding our team’s personal circumstances, we are better placed to know how to manage and motivate. Offering a booze filled trip to the races as a sales incentive might not have much attraction for a new parent for instance but offering some extra leave might be incredibly effective, however!

4. I will model a positive mindset and offer to help!

Your team will pick-up on your stress levels so it is up to you to ensure that you are aware of your own state of mind and that you can have difficult conversations in an appropriate way. You have to be honest about team and individual performance, but the focus should be on what needs to be done to change things and how you believe that they are capable of doing what is necessary. Make suggestions but also ask how you can help – your staff will no doubt have ideas that will be useful.


Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk

Read More »