Monday, 14 October 2019

Soft Skills And How To Recruit For Them




57% of hiring managers struggle to assess soft skills accurately and only 41% of companies have a formal process to assess soft skills. According to LinkedIn’s 2019 Global Talent Trends report.  So what are soft skills and how do you recruit for them?

Well, they are largely the skills that are involved with our ability to interact with others, our interpersonal skills, emotional intelligence, and empathy.  They are also largely transferable skills that are not specific to a particular role or industry.  That said they are especially important in a sales role as the ability to understand clients and their needs is a vital skill that will enable you to maintain relationships and see opportunities for new business wins and account growth as they arise.

Here are our 6 steps to help you recruit for soft skills in your business.


1. Get a current job holder involved

It might sound obvious but the first step involves articulating clearly what skills you are looking for. Soft skills are often neglected by managers and often come under very generic headings like "polished" which may be open to interpretations. Stretch your vocabulary and get specific in what you are looking for – use the person currently employed in the role to help, they will have an understanding from the coal face that you might miss. Here are some words to get you started: negotiation, creativity, persuasion, collaboration, communication, rapport building, active listening, influencing, emotional intelligence, conflict resolution, presentation skills, troubleshooting.

2. Bring the soft skills to life in your advert

The next step involves making sure you highlight these skills in your job description and advert. It’s all too easy to go into lots of detail about your fantastic products and clients and yet forget to paint a full picture of the person you hope will succeed in the role. If the candidate can relate to your ad and imagine themselves using their skills to their full potential they stand a good chance of applying. By making your company sound like a place that values their human qualities, not just technical expertise you improve your chances of attracting talent. As experienced recruiters, we can help you refine your job description and we write engaging adverts that will help bring more candidates that want to work for your company.

3. Don't underestimate the value in a "wild card"!

Another tip is to not get too fixed an idea about the background of your ideal candidate. Recruiting from different industries and using a variety of candidate sources will help you find the candidates with the skills you require. Soft skills are eminently transferable so you might find your dream candidate in an unexpected place. Recruiters can play an important role here. Recently we asked a client to reverse their decision not to interview a candidate we had recommended and this person ended up getting the job. We had carefully evaluated his abilities and we felt that this person, despite being from an unrelated background had the soft skills our client really wanted. Our client thanked us for doing this! We often throw in a "wild card" based on our knowledge of the soft skills required and it's amazing how often they are successful.

3. Ask for a covering letter to help you screen

It might sound old fashioned but some companies like to get candidates to write a cover letter or personal statement describing how they fit the job description. As well as giving you an insight into their written skills you can also judge how persuasive they may be and if they can creatively use their existing skills in a new context. This helps us get an idea of how they see the job you are advertising and whether they really have insight into what’s required. It also differentiates the applicants that are playing a numbers game and those that have a genuine interest in your role. Online tools and assessments can also help to give some guidance on soft skills. The LinkedIn report above mentioned Koru and Pymetrics, we’re also fans of Thomas Profiling. We are happy to advise you on psychometric or other tests that might be useful for your particular vacancy. Perhaps the key opportunity to assess soft skills arises at the interview.  Remember that every interview will allow you to judge some soft skills inherently – if they turn up on time it is one tick in the box for dependable, do they look you in the eye and engage with the interview questions appropriately? Do they sound confident when talking about their achievements?

4. Plan questions which uncover past experiences

Be sure to structure your interview to uncover what you want. A competency based interview with the questions standardised across all candidates will give you a baseline with which to make your judgements. Spend time creating the questions that will allow candidates to demonstrate their soft skills by using behavioural questions – focusing on their past experiences such as ‘Can you tell us about a time when you had to change someone’s mind?’  Bear in mind it is easy for someone to fabricate "what they would do" so a question that starts with this may not give you evidence of actual skills you are looking for. This is nearly impossible when asking for specific examples of what has happened in the past. 

5. Don't let your unconscious bias lead you astray!

As ever when interviewing you need to be constantly aware of your own unconscious bias. When assessing soft skills it is all too easy to be swayed by familiarity – you instinctively relate to individuals who are like yourself and may not notice that your perceptions of things like confidence may be coloured by your perceptions of someone’s accent etc. Think carefully about the evidence you gather in the interview that will support the display of the soft skills you are looking for and check your perceptions with those of others in the interviewing panel – who will hopefully be a diverse group of individuals. 
Another technique that can help you assess soft skills is to take references from colleagues as well as managers. This can give an added dimension to a candidate’s soft skills such as collaboration and persuasion. 
You might also think about giving some form of test before the interview, for instance, an in-tray exercise can demonstrate their skills in prioritisation; having them give a short presentation can show how they act under pressure, demonstrate their thinking skills and confidence.

6. Offer a work trial or taster day to the candidate you intend to offer

A more resource intensive method you may also think about is perhaps incorporating some kind of work trial or taster session. Field accompaniments or work shadow days are a great way to show a potential hire “a day in the life” of the job they are going for and most importantly a chance to ask a current job holder questions they might not get the chance to ask in an interview.

As experienced recruiters, we take the time to get to know our clients and candidates. We put forward individuals who make a great cultural and personal fit for your company.

This is why typically for every 3 interviews we schedule, one results in a job offer.

Do you need help with your sales recruitment? Our team would love to hear from you!
Phone: 01189 680831
Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk

If you enjoyed this blog you may find our others interesting too 
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Tuesday, 6 August 2019

The Real Cost of Hiring A Sales Person





The Real Cost of Hiring a Salesperson with a £100k OTE
We need to talk numbers. How much does it really cost to hire a sales person?
The rough costs of recruiting, onboarding and training a sales person for a role with a £100k OTE is around £200k minimum.

Typically, your salespeople will fall into 3 categories:


Your A Players

Your sales superstars.
This person is always hitting targets, bringing in new leads and is a consistent high performer.


Your B Players

A good performer.
Does hit targets, but not always, and does well in other aspects of the job too. Dedicated, committed and works hard, but sometimes lacks the natural flair of the A player.


Your C Players

The bottom of the rung salespeople.
Your low performers who always struggle to hit their targets and need a lot of extra support.

Obviously, in an ideal world your business would be full of A players. An A Player will out-perform a B Player by at least double, and out-perform those C Players by a factor of 5. So, if we use that £100K OTE example we mentioned earlier:

• Your A Players are achieving an average of £1M in sales per year from a standing start over 12 months. The cost of hiring an A player is £200K. So in year 1, you will have made a 5x return on your investment in hiring them, with higher chances of retaining them for longer.

• Your B Player salespeople are managing an average of £500K sales per year from that same standing start and 12-month period, and they cost the same amount to hire. So the opportunity cost of hiring an average, B Player salesperson is the £500K they are missing, compared to the A Player. That makes the true cost of hiring a B player £700K.

• Your C Players are at the bottom of the head, and are only managing an average of £200K sales per year, from a standing start, over 12 months. Taking in the gap in sales, the opportunity cost of hiring a C player is £800K, with the true cost coming in art somewhere around the £1M mark.

Of course, that is a hugely over-simplified version of the costings, but it’s realistic and it does happen in the real world. So you see, building a sales team might seem like just hiring some salespeople, but if you get it wrong, it could be difficult for you to recover from it.

Do you need help with your sales recruitment? Our team would love to hear from you!
Phone: 01189 680831
Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk
Social Media: LinkedIn | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | YouTube
Website: www.louisafleet.co.uk



The Real Cost of Hiring a Salesperson with a £100k OTE
We need to talk numbers. How much does it really cost to hire a sales person?
The rough costs of recruiting, onboarding and training a sales person for a role with a £100k OTE is around £200k minimum.

Typically, your salespeople will fall into 3 categories:


Your A Players

Your sales superstars.
This person is always hitting targets, bringing in new leads and is a consistent high performer.


Your B Players

A good performer.
Does hit targets, but not always, and does well in other aspects of the job too. Dedicated, committed and works hard, but sometimes lacks the natural flair of the A player.


Your C Players

The bottom of the rung salespeople.
Your low performers who always struggle to hit their targets and need a lot of extra support.

Obviously, in an ideal world your business would be full of A players. An A Player will out-perform a B Player by at least double, and out-perform those C Players by a factor of 5. So, if we use that £100K OTE example we mentioned earlier:

• Your A Players are achieving an average of £1M in sales per year from a standing start over 12 months. The cost of hiring an A player is £200K. So in year 1, you will have made a 5x return on your investment in hiring them, with higher chances of retaining them for longer.

• Your B Player salespeople are managing an average of £500K sales per year from that same standing start and 12-month period, and they cost the same amount to hire. So the opportunity cost of hiring an average, B Player salesperson is the £500K they are missing, compared to the A Player. That makes the true cost of hiring a B player £700K.

• Your C Players are at the bottom of the head, and are only managing an average of £200K sales per year, from a standing start, over 12 months. Taking in the gap in sales, the opportunity cost of hiring a C player is £800K, with the true cost coming in art somewhere around the £1M mark.

Of course, that is a hugely over-simplified version of the costings, but it’s realistic and it does happen in the real world. So you see, building a sales team might seem like just hiring some salespeople, but if you get it wrong, it could be difficult for you to recover from it.

Do you need help with your sales recruitment? Our team would love to hear from you!
Phone: 01189 680831
Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk
Social Media: LinkedIn | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | YouTube
Website: www.louisafleet.co.uk
Read More »

Tuesday, 23 July 2019

What Happens When Sales Recruitment Goes Wrong ?





As with all hiring decisions, there is a cost of getting it wrong and hiring the wrong salesperson for
the job can cause a lot of damage to your business particularly in terms of:


1. Sales Culture

As you build and develop a sales team, you are also building a sales culture. But if you hire a salesperson who isn’t right for the role, then your culture will take a ding. Other salespeople will feel demotivated by a colleague that isn’t performing, and high performers will often take issue with a colleague who isn’t keeping up with the team effort, causing a lot of tension within the team.


2. Brand and Reputation

When you have poor salespeople representing your brand in the market, it doesn’t take long for your brand to become tarnished. Your customers often want more than just a product or service – they want to be engaged in your ideas, your unique way of doing things. But a bad salesperson rarely offers more than canned sales pitches and discounts, commoditising your offering, and leaving prospects with a negative impression of your business.


3. Personal Reputation

It doesn’t matter if you’re the CEO, VP of sales or sales manager – you are who you hire. Your sales team doesn’t just represent your business, they represent you too. If you hire a bad salesperson, it reflects badly on you, and your judgement. If they make a serious misstep, it’s possible that customers’ trust in you will be called into question.


4. Turnover Costs

High staff turnover rates aren’t a great thing for any business, but the role you see most turnover in within any business is always sales. The average turnover rate is around 15%, with most of those leaving spending less than a year. Worse than that, the average cost to replace just one member of staff is over £30,000. So if you’re hiring the wrong salespeople you could spend a small fortune replacing them.


5. Missed Sales Opportunities

If your sales people aren’t performing well, then they are probably missing opportunities for your business. Whether that’s warm leads that are allowed to go cold, or new avenues for expansion that aren’t being explored, a bad salesperson can cost your business new opportunities.
Using a good, experienced recruiter who specialises in your type of role or industry and that has case studies and testimonials, will minimise the risk. A good recruiter will offer a rebate or replacement scheme in the unlikely event of a hire not being successful.

We are experienced sales recruiters and want to help you get your sales recruitment right. If you would like to speak to someone about how we can do that please get in touch with our team:
Phone: 01189 680831
Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk
Social Media: LinkedIn | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | YouTube
Website: www.louisafleet.co.uk



As with all hiring decisions, there is a cost of getting it wrong and hiring the wrong salesperson for
the job can cause a lot of damage to your business particularly in terms of:


1. Sales Culture

As you build and develop a sales team, you are also building a sales culture. But if you hire a salesperson who isn’t right for the role, then your culture will take a ding. Other salespeople will feel demotivated by a colleague that isn’t performing, and high performers will often take issue with a colleague who isn’t keeping up with the team effort, causing a lot of tension within the team.


2. Brand and Reputation

When you have poor salespeople representing your brand in the market, it doesn’t take long for your brand to become tarnished. Your customers often want more than just a product or service – they want to be engaged in your ideas, your unique way of doing things. But a bad salesperson rarely offers more than canned sales pitches and discounts, commoditising your offering, and leaving prospects with a negative impression of your business.


3. Personal Reputation

It doesn’t matter if you’re the CEO, VP of sales or sales manager – you are who you hire. Your sales team doesn’t just represent your business, they represent you too. If you hire a bad salesperson, it reflects badly on you, and your judgement. If they make a serious misstep, it’s possible that customers’ trust in you will be called into question.


4. Turnover Costs

High staff turnover rates aren’t a great thing for any business, but the role you see most turnover in within any business is always sales. The average turnover rate is around 15%, with most of those leaving spending less than a year. Worse than that, the average cost to replace just one member of staff is over £30,000. So if you’re hiring the wrong salespeople you could spend a small fortune replacing them.


5. Missed Sales Opportunities

If your sales people aren’t performing well, then they are probably missing opportunities for your business. Whether that’s warm leads that are allowed to go cold, or new avenues for expansion that aren’t being explored, a bad salesperson can cost your business new opportunities.
Using a good, experienced recruiter who specialises in your type of role or industry and that has case studies and testimonials, will minimise the risk. A good recruiter will offer a rebate or replacement scheme in the unlikely event of a hire not being successful.

We are experienced sales recruiters and want to help you get your sales recruitment right. If you would like to speak to someone about how we can do that please get in touch with our team:
Phone: 01189 680831
Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk
Social Media: LinkedIn | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | YouTube
Website: www.louisafleet.co.uk
Read More »

Tuesday, 9 July 2019

5 Tips To Get Yours Sales Recruitment Right






Recruiting a new sales person can feel like a long and complicated road, but it doesn’t have to be. Especially if you work with a specialist sales recruiter, who can take a lot of the strain away from you.


Here are 5 things they could help you with to get your sales recruitment right:

1. Repeatable hiring process

Especially in the early days, it’s important to hire very carefully since each hire has huge potential to impact a smaller company. Using the right process will help to ensure that each hire is the right fit for both the business and the sales team as a whole. If that process can be repeated, then you can grow your team as and when you need it, without having to try new techniques and avenues each time.

2. Use a recruiter

Recruiters have huge databases of candidates who they can screen and pre-interview for you, based on your hiring criteria. You will then be given a shortlist of candidates to interview, rather than having to go through the entire recruitment process yourself. When you find a recruitment company that works for you, you can simply go to them every time you need a new sales rep, and this becomes a repeatable, easy process for your business. And because the recruiter knows your business and what you’re looking for, you’ll take less and less time to hire a salesperson, and you get a better quality of candidate too!

3. Get the advertising right

When it’s time to hire new salespeople, hiring managers often just drag out an outdated job posting and add it to the ‘careers’ section of their website, or post the job profile to listings sites. This might be the easy option, but you will soon find your desk flooded with the CV’s of unqualified salespeople. So, save yourself some time and design a job ad that will sort out the wheat from the chaff for you. Make sure you include all of the information a candidate would need to apply, avoid clichés and really focus on what makes your business different. And if you’re not sure if your advert is performing, ask a recruiter to take a look, or even write one up for you.

4. Professional assessments

Successful salespeople are driven, resilient and competitive people with a strong desire to influence others. These traits are all common in top performing salespeople. But they are also traits that are commonly misjudged, and they can present a challenge to an interviewer who’s trying to distinguish between an A-player candidate and an average or below average seller. If you want to make sure you’re hiring the right people for the job, ask your recruiter to talk you through the various psychometric tests, cognitive tests and simulations you can run through with sales candidates, which will tell you all about their sales personality, their reasoning and memory, and how they would approach various situations in your business. You can include these professional assessments at any point in the recruitment process, but we recommend either before or as part of the interview process for maximum effectiveness.

5. Interview skills

Many people think it’s just the interviewee that needs to prepare for job interviews. But that’s really not the case. After all, interviews are a two-way conversation and interviewers can also benefit from brushing up on the basics. So, before you start the interview process, take some time to fine tune your own approach. This is something else a recruiter can help you with. If you’re new to hiring salespeople, or interviewing in general, a recruiter can help you by suggesting questions you can ask, what answers you should be looking for and even the general format. Their job is to help you hire a salesperson, and that means making sure you have all the tools you need to make the best decision.
Do you want some help to get your sales recruitment right?

Our team would love to hear from you:
Phone: 01189 680831
Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk
Social Media: LinkedIn | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | YouTube
Website: www.louisafleet.co.uk




Recruiting a new sales person can feel like a long and complicated road, but it doesn’t have to be. Especially if you work with a specialist sales recruiter, who can take a lot of the strain away from you.


Here are 5 things they could help you with to get your sales recruitment right:

1. Repeatable hiring process

Especially in the early days, it’s important to hire very carefully since each hire has huge potential to impact a smaller company. Using the right process will help to ensure that each hire is the right fit for both the business and the sales team as a whole. If that process can be repeated, then you can grow your team as and when you need it, without having to try new techniques and avenues each time.

2. Use a recruiter

Recruiters have huge databases of candidates who they can screen and pre-interview for you, based on your hiring criteria. You will then be given a shortlist of candidates to interview, rather than having to go through the entire recruitment process yourself. When you find a recruitment company that works for you, you can simply go to them every time you need a new sales rep, and this becomes a repeatable, easy process for your business. And because the recruiter knows your business and what you’re looking for, you’ll take less and less time to hire a salesperson, and you get a better quality of candidate too!

3. Get the advertising right

When it’s time to hire new salespeople, hiring managers often just drag out an outdated job posting and add it to the ‘careers’ section of their website, or post the job profile to listings sites. This might be the easy option, but you will soon find your desk flooded with the CV’s of unqualified salespeople. So, save yourself some time and design a job ad that will sort out the wheat from the chaff for you. Make sure you include all of the information a candidate would need to apply, avoid clichés and really focus on what makes your business different. And if you’re not sure if your advert is performing, ask a recruiter to take a look, or even write one up for you.

4. Professional assessments

Successful salespeople are driven, resilient and competitive people with a strong desire to influence others. These traits are all common in top performing salespeople. But they are also traits that are commonly misjudged, and they can present a challenge to an interviewer who’s trying to distinguish between an A-player candidate and an average or below average seller. If you want to make sure you’re hiring the right people for the job, ask your recruiter to talk you through the various psychometric tests, cognitive tests and simulations you can run through with sales candidates, which will tell you all about their sales personality, their reasoning and memory, and how they would approach various situations in your business. You can include these professional assessments at any point in the recruitment process, but we recommend either before or as part of the interview process for maximum effectiveness.

5. Interview skills

Many people think it’s just the interviewee that needs to prepare for job interviews. But that’s really not the case. After all, interviews are a two-way conversation and interviewers can also benefit from brushing up on the basics. So, before you start the interview process, take some time to fine tune your own approach. This is something else a recruiter can help you with. If you’re new to hiring salespeople, or interviewing in general, a recruiter can help you by suggesting questions you can ask, what answers you should be looking for and even the general format. Their job is to help you hire a salesperson, and that means making sure you have all the tools you need to make the best decision.
Do you want some help to get your sales recruitment right?

Our team would love to hear from you:
Phone: 01189 680831
Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk
Social Media: LinkedIn | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | YouTube
Website: www.louisafleet.co.uk
Read More »

Tuesday, 25 June 2019

It Takes All Sorts To Build A Sales Team





According to the various studies, salespeople generally fall into eight categories. These categories represent behavioural tendencies in sales situations, rather than set-in-stone personalities. Managers can effect changes in their current salespeople, and recruit better team members in the future, if they understand what these eight types are, and how they all interact.


We help you to understand the 8 different styles of sales people here:

1. Experts

They make selling seem effortless, keep customers happy and consistently outperform their peers. Experts are best used to mentor up-and-coming sales staff and spread best practices throughout the team. Around 9% of salespeople fall into this group.


2. Closers

Closers are usually the ones who pull in the very big deals, typically in product sales areas rather than services. They are great at countering customer objections, and are often where some of the stereotypes of salespeople can come from. But their smooth-talking style can be off-putting to some customers. This accounts for around 13% of salespeople.


3. Consultants

These salespeople listen well and are very good problem solvers. They are skilled at developing solutions that meet their customer’s needs, but they tend to be one dimensional, and often forgo valuable case study examples that could boost sales. Consultants make up around 15% of salespeople.


4. Storytellers

Storytellers are heavily customer focused and love to provide stories and case studies in their sales pitches. They build strong customer relationships resulting in loyal, long-term sales relationships. This can yield a lot of positive results, but they can often ‘talk through the sale’ and indulge in long meetings that don’t actually close a sale. Storytellers account for 7% of salespeople.


5. Focusers

Know their products inside out, and believe in them 100%, but might lack the confidence to sell them effectively. They often insist on detailing every product feature and may not hear the customer’s needs. They may need some support in listening skills, and how to use their skills and dedication to meet customer’s needs. Focusers account for 19% of salespeople.


6. Narrators

These salespeople know their offerings and the market, but can be overly dependent on scripts when selling. They cling desperately to marketing materials, and fail to respond properly to challenging questions. 15% of salespeople are narrators.


7. Aggressors

Aggressors approach sales meetings purely as price negotiations. They can score some big wins and they rarely concede too much, but some customers will be put off by such a combative approach. Aggressors make up 7% of salespeople.


8. Socialisers

The last category is socialisers. They may initially impress customers with their friendly chat about things like children and cars, but they often struggle to get past this, and don’t tend to close many deals on their own. 15% of salespeople are socialisers.
As you can see, all of these styles have their own advantages and disadvantages, and there is no ‘one perfect’ type of salesperson. Different industries will demand different approaches, and often the ideal sales team is made up of a mix of these styles. By consciously recruiting salespeople with complimentary styles and managing your sales team to facilitate (and make the best use of) these styles, you can create a really strong and effective sales team from day one.

Do you want some help finding the next superstar for your sales team? Get in touch with our team now!
Phone: 01189 680831
Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk
Social Media: LinkedIn | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | YouTube
Website: www.louisafleet.co.uk



According to the various studies, salespeople generally fall into eight categories. These categories represent behavioural tendencies in sales situations, rather than set-in-stone personalities. Managers can effect changes in their current salespeople, and recruit better team members in the future, if they understand what these eight types are, and how they all interact.


We help you to understand the 8 different styles of sales people here:

1. Experts

They make selling seem effortless, keep customers happy and consistently outperform their peers. Experts are best used to mentor up-and-coming sales staff and spread best practices throughout the team. Around 9% of salespeople fall into this group.


2. Closers

Closers are usually the ones who pull in the very big deals, typically in product sales areas rather than services. They are great at countering customer objections, and are often where some of the stereotypes of salespeople can come from. But their smooth-talking style can be off-putting to some customers. This accounts for around 13% of salespeople.


3. Consultants

These salespeople listen well and are very good problem solvers. They are skilled at developing solutions that meet their customer’s needs, but they tend to be one dimensional, and often forgo valuable case study examples that could boost sales. Consultants make up around 15% of salespeople.


4. Storytellers

Storytellers are heavily customer focused and love to provide stories and case studies in their sales pitches. They build strong customer relationships resulting in loyal, long-term sales relationships. This can yield a lot of positive results, but they can often ‘talk through the sale’ and indulge in long meetings that don’t actually close a sale. Storytellers account for 7% of salespeople.


5. Focusers

Know their products inside out, and believe in them 100%, but might lack the confidence to sell them effectively. They often insist on detailing every product feature and may not hear the customer’s needs. They may need some support in listening skills, and how to use their skills and dedication to meet customer’s needs. Focusers account for 19% of salespeople.


6. Narrators

These salespeople know their offerings and the market, but can be overly dependent on scripts when selling. They cling desperately to marketing materials, and fail to respond properly to challenging questions. 15% of salespeople are narrators.


7. Aggressors

Aggressors approach sales meetings purely as price negotiations. They can score some big wins and they rarely concede too much, but some customers will be put off by such a combative approach. Aggressors make up 7% of salespeople.


8. Socialisers

The last category is socialisers. They may initially impress customers with their friendly chat about things like children and cars, but they often struggle to get past this, and don’t tend to close many deals on their own. 15% of salespeople are socialisers.
As you can see, all of these styles have their own advantages and disadvantages, and there is no ‘one perfect’ type of salesperson. Different industries will demand different approaches, and often the ideal sales team is made up of a mix of these styles. By consciously recruiting salespeople with complimentary styles and managing your sales team to facilitate (and make the best use of) these styles, you can create a really strong and effective sales team from day one.

Do you want some help finding the next superstar for your sales team? Get in touch with our team now!
Phone: 01189 680831
Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk
Social Media: LinkedIn | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | YouTube
Website: www.louisafleet.co.uk
Read More »

Tuesday, 11 June 2019

Questions to ask yourself when building a Sales Team






When you’ve decided that your business is ready for a bigger, better sales team, you might want to start recruiting new sales people right away.

But it’s worth taking a little time to plan the best approach.

Successful sales teams are ones who have been carefully recruited and managed to meet the needs of the business, its customers and its co-workers.

And they are matched 2 ways. Not just in terms of what you want but also in terms of the candidates wants and aspirations in a role. This should result in the right person that will perform in your role and stay for the long term.

So – our advice is to sit down and analyse what you need from your sales team and here are some useful questions to help you get started:

What business do you need this person to generate?


Ideal client?
Size and industry sector?
Typical value of sale?
Geographical area?
How many accounts?
How much revenue?
How much new business?
What is your typical sales process?

What support can you offer to help targets be achieved?


Leads
CRM
Training
Existing accounts
Budget for entertaining
Networking
Field accompaniments
Experienced sales people that are available to mentor
Marketing budget

Be honest with yourself, if there is no support or limited support you will need someone that is completely independent- they are out there but you’ll need to pay more money to get them. The more you give in help and support and the less experience you require, the less you need to pay.

Typical activities and reporting

Number of appointments
How often do they need to report to the office?
How often will they need to be at Head Office?
How frequently do you hold 121 meetings?
When do your sales meetings take place?
Who will they answer to on a daily basis?
Can this person be based from home?

These are the sorts of questions that candidates will want to know at interview stage.

What background or industry experience do you require?

It’s easy to just look for candidates from the same industry as you work in. We advise to interview competitor candidates with extreme caution. Don’t be blinded by the fact they know your industry. Candidates that continually hop from one competitor to another often come with “grass is greener syndrome” and with pre-conceived ideas and this can be difficult to manage. Consider the right personality fit and transferrable skills. Candidates who have sold to a similar customer base could really widen your candidate pool.

Do you really need a seasoned sales person who has lots of experience?
Why?
What about someone new to sales but with the enthusiasm, drive and determination to succeed that you can mould?

What type of sales personality are they?

A lot of hiring managers want a new business hunter who is going to go out there, make the appointments, close the deal and be hungry for the next one.
These people like to work at a fast pace so shorter sales cycles work best. These people can be less organised, they don’t like admin, and lengthy processes with a lot of red tape are a turn off, so think about what you are asking for in a sales person and what this means in terms of how you may need to support them.

Or consider…

Is a relationship builder or an account manager type a better fit with your target market? Do your accounts need nurturing and growing over a long period of time?  If so, don’t ask these people to pass the accounts once they’ve won them, they won’t enjoy this at all!

Think about people that haven’t worked out before and why?

Was it their experience or personality that didn’t work?
Why was this?

Deciding all of this in advance means that you are weeding out a lot of the wheat from the chaff without having to even see their CVs.

If you have thought about these things in advance you can be clearer about the role to candidates in your hiring process and you are more likely to attract the right sale person type to your business. Those that will perform and stay!

Recruiting and need some help to hire the right people for your sales team?

Our team are here to help – get in touch by one of these ways:

Phone: 01189 680831
Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk
Social Media: LinkedIn | Facebook Twitter | YouTube | Instagram
Website: www.louisafleet.co.uk






When you’ve decided that your business is ready for a bigger, better sales team, you might want to start recruiting new sales people right away.

But it’s worth taking a little time to plan the best approach.

Successful sales teams are ones who have been carefully recruited and managed to meet the needs of the business, its customers and its co-workers.

And they are matched 2 ways. Not just in terms of what you want but also in terms of the candidates wants and aspirations in a role. This should result in the right person that will perform in your role and stay for the long term.

So – our advice is to sit down and analyse what you need from your sales team and here are some useful questions to help you get started:

What business do you need this person to generate?


Ideal client?
Size and industry sector?
Typical value of sale?
Geographical area?
How many accounts?
How much revenue?
How much new business?
What is your typical sales process?

What support can you offer to help targets be achieved?


Leads
CRM
Training
Existing accounts
Budget for entertaining
Networking
Field accompaniments
Experienced sales people that are available to mentor
Marketing budget

Be honest with yourself, if there is no support or limited support you will need someone that is completely independent- they are out there but you’ll need to pay more money to get them. The more you give in help and support and the less experience you require, the less you need to pay.

Typical activities and reporting

Number of appointments
How often do they need to report to the office?
How often will they need to be at Head Office?
How frequently do you hold 121 meetings?
When do your sales meetings take place?
Who will they answer to on a daily basis?
Can this person be based from home?

These are the sorts of questions that candidates will want to know at interview stage.

What background or industry experience do you require?

It’s easy to just look for candidates from the same industry as you work in. We advise to interview competitor candidates with extreme caution. Don’t be blinded by the fact they know your industry. Candidates that continually hop from one competitor to another often come with “grass is greener syndrome” and with pre-conceived ideas and this can be difficult to manage. Consider the right personality fit and transferrable skills. Candidates who have sold to a similar customer base could really widen your candidate pool.

Do you really need a seasoned sales person who has lots of experience?
Why?
What about someone new to sales but with the enthusiasm, drive and determination to succeed that you can mould?

What type of sales personality are they?

A lot of hiring managers want a new business hunter who is going to go out there, make the appointments, close the deal and be hungry for the next one.
These people like to work at a fast pace so shorter sales cycles work best. These people can be less organised, they don’t like admin, and lengthy processes with a lot of red tape are a turn off, so think about what you are asking for in a sales person and what this means in terms of how you may need to support them.

Or consider…

Is a relationship builder or an account manager type a better fit with your target market? Do your accounts need nurturing and growing over a long period of time?  If so, don’t ask these people to pass the accounts once they’ve won them, they won’t enjoy this at all!

Think about people that haven’t worked out before and why?

Was it their experience or personality that didn’t work?
Why was this?

Deciding all of this in advance means that you are weeding out a lot of the wheat from the chaff without having to even see their CVs.

If you have thought about these things in advance you can be clearer about the role to candidates in your hiring process and you are more likely to attract the right sale person type to your business. Those that will perform and stay!

Recruiting and need some help to hire the right people for your sales team?

Our team are here to help – get in touch by one of these ways:

Phone: 01189 680831
Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk
Social Media: LinkedIn | Facebook Twitter | YouTube | Instagram
Website: www.louisafleet.co.uk

Read More »

Wednesday, 29 May 2019

4 Things to Remember when Training your Sales Team




Not so long ago we wrote a blog about value for money in sales training, which you can read here.

Today we want to talk to you about 4 things we think you should remember when training your sales team:

1. Not everyone is the same

Everyone is unique, in their preferences, in the way they take in information and in the way they prefer to learn.

Remember that sales people come in a wide variety of styles and each has their own strengths and weaknesses; so, while you will need to give every sales person you hire the same basic training, remember that it pays to be flexible.

As your sales people settle into their role, observe their behaviour and identify areas where they could improve, give them opportunities to develop the skills they lack and tailor their training around that.

2. Invest the time

Even if you’re hiring a seasoned sales person, they’ve never sold on behalf of your company before, or worked with your sales process.

So, it’s worth investing some time in training them in the right style for your business.

This could be online training, internal training, or external training days. The key is to find a training system that reflects your values as a business and the skills you want your sales people to demonstrate.

3. Team training

Sales people are very competitive and it’s very easy for them to slip into ‘every man for himself’. But a great sales team will work together.

Your sales people are a team, so while it’s ok to foster some light competition, don’t pit them against each other. It can be very valuable to train sales people both individually and as a team.

4. It doesn’t end at the end of the probationary period

This is a mistake lots of businesses make and is ultimately why a lot of sales people’s performance starts to dip after their probationary period is up.

Just because a sales person has been with you for six months, doesn’t mean they are done learning. In fact, the learning never stops.

The best way to build and develop a successful sales team is to integrate learning and development into their ongoing career plan. But you don’t have to invest in intensive and expensive training to do this – in fact, it’s usually best that you don’t. The intensive training should be happening during probation.

Once your salesperson is more established in the business, the focus should be on continued light development through a variety of channels, from top-up training to books.

We can give you lots more sales recruitment tips and advice – just get in touch:

Phone: 01189 680831
Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk
Website: www.louisafleet.co.uk
Social Media: LinkedIn | Facebook Twitter | YouTube | Instagram



Not so long ago we wrote a blog about value for money in sales training, which you can read here.

Today we want to talk to you about 4 things we think you should remember when training your sales team:

1. Not everyone is the same

Everyone is unique, in their preferences, in the way they take in information and in the way they prefer to learn.

Remember that sales people come in a wide variety of styles and each has their own strengths and weaknesses; so, while you will need to give every sales person you hire the same basic training, remember that it pays to be flexible.

As your sales people settle into their role, observe their behaviour and identify areas where they could improve, give them opportunities to develop the skills they lack and tailor their training around that.

2. Invest the time

Even if you’re hiring a seasoned sales person, they’ve never sold on behalf of your company before, or worked with your sales process.

So, it’s worth investing some time in training them in the right style for your business.

This could be online training, internal training, or external training days. The key is to find a training system that reflects your values as a business and the skills you want your sales people to demonstrate.

3. Team training

Sales people are very competitive and it’s very easy for them to slip into ‘every man for himself’. But a great sales team will work together.

Your sales people are a team, so while it’s ok to foster some light competition, don’t pit them against each other. It can be very valuable to train sales people both individually and as a team.

4. It doesn’t end at the end of the probationary period

This is a mistake lots of businesses make and is ultimately why a lot of sales people’s performance starts to dip after their probationary period is up.

Just because a sales person has been with you for six months, doesn’t mean they are done learning. In fact, the learning never stops.

The best way to build and develop a successful sales team is to integrate learning and development into their ongoing career plan. But you don’t have to invest in intensive and expensive training to do this – in fact, it’s usually best that you don’t. The intensive training should be happening during probation.

Once your salesperson is more established in the business, the focus should be on continued light development through a variety of channels, from top-up training to books.

We can give you lots more sales recruitment tips and advice – just get in touch:

Phone: 01189 680831
Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk
Website: www.louisafleet.co.uk
Social Media: LinkedIn | Facebook Twitter | YouTube | Instagram
Read More »