Tuesday, 7 July 2020

The Challenges Sales Teams Face When Returning To Work




The COVID-19 pandemic came out of the blue and disrupted everything. Almost every sector of the economy was upended, and most businesses had to lay off or furlough some employees. Even with businesses gradually resuming operations with the eased lock-down, there's no denying some things may never go back to how they used to be. As organisations adjust to this new norm in the business landscape, salespeople will be amongst the most critical employees in getting businesses moving again. However, this won't be without challenges. Here, we will analyse the challenges salespeople are likely to face as they return to work.

What changes are salespeople expected to endure and get used to as they return to work?


With corona virus forcing lots of businesses to cut back on travel and in-person meetings, salespeople returning to work will have to carry on with as minimal contact as possible with clients and prospects. This means that phone calls or video conferencing calls will have to replace what could have been face to face meetings. Be prepared to make your sales pitch over web-based presentations instead of on-site meetings. Altogether, physical meetings may not be an option, as your client may be working exclusively from home, or just not meeting physically with anyone until the pandemic subsides. This is a change that might prove difficult for the sales team as physical interactions oftentimes provides an advantage for salespeople. Without this advantage, the sales team has their work cut out for them as they'll need to go the extra mile to communicate their value and ultimately make the sale.

How will people cope with going back to work after furlough?


After being on furlough for weeks, it is sensible to expect that some employees may struggle with the transition back into working full time again. It is important to understand that your sales team will not just pick up from where they left off. It won't be business as usual, and without proper training to slowly ease them back into this new work culture, it may not be business at all for a while. The company can start by training the salespeople on how to engage with customers online using technology as in-person meetings and face to face conversations may not be possible for a while. Focusing on training and managing expectations around what can and will be achieved upon their return to work is important and will give everyone the time they need to settle into this new normal, and back to contacting and engaging clients.

How can business owners deal with uncertainties about returning to work?


One of the key qualities of an excellent salesperson is confidence. Low levels of confidence in your sales team will definitely have a negative effect on performance and considering the importance of the sales team to cash inflow, the last thing your business needs is poor performance from that department. With so much uncertainty in the air, companies should prepare to handle staff who may feel anxious about returning to work. Like earlier mentioned, proper training will help the salespeople navigate and get comfortable quickly as they return to work after being furloughed. It’s also worth noting that experiences of lock-down are varied; while some may have enjoyed it, others may have found it extremely difficult. Having support in place for those that need it is a worthwhile step to take to ensure a happy and productive workplace.

How will the pandemic change the landscape of sales going forward?


Owing to the pandemic, most, if not every, customer's situation has changed. Salespeople would need to build sales interaction around understanding the customer’s new perception of the world and how they can add value to customers. Businesses might need to re engineer their solutions to help customers with their corona virus concerns. Essentially, the sales team will need to rethink what the key benefits of their products and services are and how they can angle those benefits to help their clients ease those corona virus concerns.

For the foreseeable future, your sales pitch must explain to clients how your solutions can help them stabilize or improve operations, adapt to corona virus and get through the crisis. As earlier mentioned, technology will now become a core component of the business landscape and people in sales need to get comfortable using technology and managing online sales conversations. Basically, sales and managing directors need to get more creative with collaboration tools, communication apps and other technologies to keep sales advancing in the market.

The landscape of sales may never be the same again, but that isn't necessarily a bad thing. As salespeople adjust to working in the current climate, they will need to adapt to the (temporary) changes in consumer behaviour and embrace digital opportunities to stay in contact with clients. Your ability to understand your client's situation and work through the change will be key to delivering value.


Many sales leaders have been forced to evaluate their current sales and support teams, and make changes where necessary to ensure they are in the strongest position to meet the company goals moving forward. If you would like a confidential discussion about how we can help you build and retain a winning sales team ready for the new normal, we’d be delighted to arrange an appointment for you to speak with Louisa.


And please do join our Sales Leadership Q and A group on Facebook, where we have sales leaders and experts sharing best practice, resources and collaborating. Perfect if you're leading or building a sales team. 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/643702969807741/

Get in touch with one of the team today:







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Monday, 15 June 2020

Getting Ready To Restructure Your Business




If like many organisations you are in a position where you may need to look at restructuring your business, you may find this blog useful from our friends at Organic P&O Solutions.


Getting Ready To Restructure Your Business? 6 Steps You Must Follow.

To be successful, your business will have to evolve continually. As it grows, you’re likely to have to reorganise at various points on your journey. Sometimes you might want to make changes to take advantage of new opportunities. At other times, you may need to adapt your business model to respond to challenges.


In our experience, a company that has grown to employ 20 – 25 employees and beyond can anticipate having to restructure every 12 to 18 months on average.


As businesses adjust to trading in the current climate, many will likely need to look at how they are structured. This might involve reviewing and redefining the roles of some employees, and without suitable alternative positions available within a new set up, it might mean having to make some redundancies.


Understandably for employees, an organisational restructure can be an unsettling time, which means it’s important to manage it well. The consequences of not doing so can include added disruption to business, a damaged reputation – and where redundancies are involved, time and expense in defending employment tribunal claims.


In planning any restructure likely to result in changes to job roles or redundancies, it’s essential for an employer to consult with their employees before they make any final decisions.


Here at Organic P&O Solutions, we help business owners and management teams make the (sometimes tough) decisions required to change the shape of their organisations – and to do so in a way that is compliant and fair for all parties.

When a restructure goes wrong, it’s often because the business involved has not fulfilled its obligation to consult with affected staff, or because somewhere in the process, it has failed to follow the correct procedures.


If you’re planning a restructure in your organisation, having the support of a professional HR advisor is highly recommended. Because every restructure is different and has its own unique dynamics, there’s much more to consider than the linear process. This said, there are some fundamental points to keep in mind when you’re preparing to implement a change like this:


1. Review all your business options


Based on the information you have available, and what you are reasonably able to anticipate, you will need to consider all the business options open to you.

If for example, your business has experienced a significant drop in revenue, you’ll need to review – and where possible, reduce overheads in the short term. Looking further ahead and using data extracted from your management accounts, you’ll need to calculate how long your business will be able to trade on the reduced income – and consider what options are open to you longer term should the situation persist.

2. Review staffing against your business options


When you have listed your business options, you will be in a position to review your staffing structure in relation to each potential scenario. It’s important to show you’ve considered your options in this order.

You’ll need to consider each option against the key criteria, making sure you’re being fair and reasonable at each juncture – being extremely mindful at this point to set aside the personal situations or personalities of individual employees.

3. Recognise your obligation to consult with staff


Don’t make the mistake of thinking that restructuring your organisation is purely a business decision, and you don’t need to consult with your employees.


If you’re planning a restructure that’s going to require staff to have to change roles or result in redundancies, you’re statutorily bound to engage in a meaningful consultation process with those staff who will be affected.


Crucially, this doesn’t mean sharing a restructuring plan that’s set in stone and just expecting staff to adopt it.  All too often, we hear of business owners who work on a restructuring plan in isolation, before presenting it to their workforce as a fait acompli: an action more likely to lead to conflict and arbitration than collaboration.


Ideally, it’s best to communicate with staff openly and honestly from the outset. This way, there will be complete transparency before the consultation process begins. You’ll have to allow time for affected employees to respond with alternative solutions, and no definitive decisions can be made until the consultation process has been completed.


4. Pause recruitment activity


If you’re planning any redundancies as part of your restructure, you’ll need to consider whether those employees affected might be offered any other suitable alternative employment within your organisation. To this end, you should pause any recruitment activity during the process.


5. Advise affected staff


When you have identified your preferred restructure route, your next step must be to notify any employees who will potentially be affected, formally advising them that you intend to enter a consultation process.


6. Consult with affected staff


Having taken the appropriate steps up to this point, you’re now ready to consult with affected employees. You will be able to share your proposed restructure plan together with your reasons and rationale for putting it forward.


At the same time, you’ll need to make it clear that no decisions have yet been taken, and you are open to any alternative solutions those affected might want to propose.


You must leave space for plans to evolve and change, and time for other parties to put forward alternative solutions and have them fully considered – so that by the time a final decision is reached, all options have been explored.


I often liken the process of going into a restructure to kicking a rugby ball into the air. In the same way you can’t know which way the ball will bounce on landing, it’s virtually impossible to predict how a restructure proposal will be received when you’re dealing with people and emotions.


Employers will frequently go in one of two directions. They’ll either procrastinate and go around in circles as they attempt to get inside their employees’ heads – trying to anticipate and address questions they can’t possibly know. Or they’ll simply impose their preferred restructure option without consultation, believing they’ve explored all avenues and no other solution is available.

The first of these routes wastes time and energy and is ultimately ineffective as the clarity of any original objective is lost. The second is clearly unlawful.

Going back to my rugby ball analogy, a restructure can have a clearly defined process, but it won’t be linear, and along the way, it will bob and weave. To ensure it runs smoothly and results in a successful outcome, the support of an HR professional who can help you manage the human aspects involved with implementing change – as well as guiding you in respect of compliance, is essential.

Focusing exclusively on compliance when making decisions is not necessarily the best way forward. In some situations, taking human considerations into account might cost you a little more time and/or money – but save you a lot in terms of how your business is perceived by others. This may be a particularly important consideration for owners of small and mid-size companies who have a high profile in their local community.

Can We Help Your Business Restructure?

Do you need to change the shape of your business? Organic P&O Solutions can advise and support you through every step of the process.  We’ll help you balance compliance with fairness so that your team transitions smoothly and painlessly, and we’ll make sure that when your restructure is complete, the reputation of your business – and your conscience – remain fully intact!

Call us today to arrange an initial conversation on 01344 441 043.




If like many organisations you are in a position where you may need to look at restructuring your business, you may find this blog useful from our friends at Organic P&O Solutions.


Getting Ready To Restructure Your Business? 6 Steps You Must Follow.

To be successful, your business will have to evolve continually. As it grows, you’re likely to have to reorganise at various points on your journey. Sometimes you might want to make changes to take advantage of new opportunities. At other times, you may need to adapt your business model to respond to challenges.


In our experience, a company that has grown to employ 20 – 25 employees and beyond can anticipate having to restructure every 12 to 18 months on average.


As businesses adjust to trading in the current climate, many will likely need to look at how they are structured. This might involve reviewing and redefining the roles of some employees, and without suitable alternative positions available within a new set up, it might mean having to make some redundancies.


Understandably for employees, an organisational restructure can be an unsettling time, which means it’s important to manage it well. The consequences of not doing so can include added disruption to business, a damaged reputation – and where redundancies are involved, time and expense in defending employment tribunal claims.


In planning any restructure likely to result in changes to job roles or redundancies, it’s essential for an employer to consult with their employees before they make any final decisions.


Here at Organic P&O Solutions, we help business owners and management teams make the (sometimes tough) decisions required to change the shape of their organisations – and to do so in a way that is compliant and fair for all parties.

When a restructure goes wrong, it’s often because the business involved has not fulfilled its obligation to consult with affected staff, or because somewhere in the process, it has failed to follow the correct procedures.


If you’re planning a restructure in your organisation, having the support of a professional HR advisor is highly recommended. Because every restructure is different and has its own unique dynamics, there’s much more to consider than the linear process. This said, there are some fundamental points to keep in mind when you’re preparing to implement a change like this:


1. Review all your business options


Based on the information you have available, and what you are reasonably able to anticipate, you will need to consider all the business options open to you.

If for example, your business has experienced a significant drop in revenue, you’ll need to review – and where possible, reduce overheads in the short term. Looking further ahead and using data extracted from your management accounts, you’ll need to calculate how long your business will be able to trade on the reduced income – and consider what options are open to you longer term should the situation persist.

2. Review staffing against your business options


When you have listed your business options, you will be in a position to review your staffing structure in relation to each potential scenario. It’s important to show you’ve considered your options in this order.

You’ll need to consider each option against the key criteria, making sure you’re being fair and reasonable at each juncture – being extremely mindful at this point to set aside the personal situations or personalities of individual employees.

3. Recognise your obligation to consult with staff


Don’t make the mistake of thinking that restructuring your organisation is purely a business decision, and you don’t need to consult with your employees.


If you’re planning a restructure that’s going to require staff to have to change roles or result in redundancies, you’re statutorily bound to engage in a meaningful consultation process with those staff who will be affected.


Crucially, this doesn’t mean sharing a restructuring plan that’s set in stone and just expecting staff to adopt it.  All too often, we hear of business owners who work on a restructuring plan in isolation, before presenting it to their workforce as a fait acompli: an action more likely to lead to conflict and arbitration than collaboration.


Ideally, it’s best to communicate with staff openly and honestly from the outset. This way, there will be complete transparency before the consultation process begins. You’ll have to allow time for affected employees to respond with alternative solutions, and no definitive decisions can be made until the consultation process has been completed.


4. Pause recruitment activity


If you’re planning any redundancies as part of your restructure, you’ll need to consider whether those employees affected might be offered any other suitable alternative employment within your organisation. To this end, you should pause any recruitment activity during the process.


5. Advise affected staff


When you have identified your preferred restructure route, your next step must be to notify any employees who will potentially be affected, formally advising them that you intend to enter a consultation process.


6. Consult with affected staff


Having taken the appropriate steps up to this point, you’re now ready to consult with affected employees. You will be able to share your proposed restructure plan together with your reasons and rationale for putting it forward.


At the same time, you’ll need to make it clear that no decisions have yet been taken, and you are open to any alternative solutions those affected might want to propose.


You must leave space for plans to evolve and change, and time for other parties to put forward alternative solutions and have them fully considered – so that by the time a final decision is reached, all options have been explored.


I often liken the process of going into a restructure to kicking a rugby ball into the air. In the same way you can’t know which way the ball will bounce on landing, it’s virtually impossible to predict how a restructure proposal will be received when you’re dealing with people and emotions.


Employers will frequently go in one of two directions. They’ll either procrastinate and go around in circles as they attempt to get inside their employees’ heads – trying to anticipate and address questions they can’t possibly know. Or they’ll simply impose their preferred restructure option without consultation, believing they’ve explored all avenues and no other solution is available.

The first of these routes wastes time and energy and is ultimately ineffective as the clarity of any original objective is lost. The second is clearly unlawful.

Going back to my rugby ball analogy, a restructure can have a clearly defined process, but it won’t be linear, and along the way, it will bob and weave. To ensure it runs smoothly and results in a successful outcome, the support of an HR professional who can help you manage the human aspects involved with implementing change – as well as guiding you in respect of compliance, is essential.

Focusing exclusively on compliance when making decisions is not necessarily the best way forward. In some situations, taking human considerations into account might cost you a little more time and/or money – but save you a lot in terms of how your business is perceived by others. This may be a particularly important consideration for owners of small and mid-size companies who have a high profile in their local community.

Can We Help Your Business Restructure?

Do you need to change the shape of your business? Organic P&O Solutions can advise and support you through every step of the process.  We’ll help you balance compliance with fairness so that your team transitions smoothly and painlessly, and we’ll make sure that when your restructure is complete, the reputation of your business – and your conscience – remain fully intact!

Call us today to arrange an initial conversation on 01344 441 043.

Read More »

Thursday, 23 April 2020

Video Interview Tips







Do you have an online interview coming up? Yes, we are in lock-down but these mistakes are unnecessary!

We have been astonished by how candidates are not treating online video interviews as seriously as face to face.

Stories from our clients about candidates include:

Fixing the camera position whilst the interviewer waits.
Putting their hair up as they are being interviewed.
Being interviewed in their gym gear.
Expecting to be “told about the job” as opposed to having the information to hand with the job they applied for.
Sat in a place with the radio on, the dog barking, and a cat walking in front of the screen.
Shouting at family members to be quiet as they are on the phone.
Not being ready on time.
Not being able to log on to the link that was sent in advance.

EASY TO DO'S THAT MAKE A DIFFERENCE:

1. Be in a tidy area in a well lit room
2. Put the camera in the head and shoulder view
3. Dress smart - it is an interview!
4. Prepare, the same as you would if you were attending a company site
5. Test the link when you get it - not at the time of the interview
6. Be ready 15 minutes early. Log on to the link 5 minutes before
7. CV and job details to hand
8. Finally - Have some questions ready and don't forget to smile


If you need any more advice, please get in touch with one of the team today:

Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk







Do you have an online interview coming up? Yes, we are in lock-down but these mistakes are unnecessary!

We have been astonished by how candidates are not treating online video interviews as seriously as face to face.

Stories from our clients about candidates include:

Fixing the camera position whilst the interviewer waits.
Putting their hair up as they are being interviewed.
Being interviewed in their gym gear.
Expecting to be “told about the job” as opposed to having the information to hand with the job they applied for.
Sat in a place with the radio on, the dog barking, and a cat walking in front of the screen.
Shouting at family members to be quiet as they are on the phone.
Not being ready on time.
Not being able to log on to the link that was sent in advance.

EASY TO DO'S THAT MAKE A DIFFERENCE:

1. Be in a tidy area in a well lit room
2. Put the camera in the head and shoulder view
3. Dress smart - it is an interview!
4. Prepare, the same as you would if you were attending a company site
5. Test the link when you get it - not at the time of the interview
6. Be ready 15 minutes early. Log on to the link 5 minutes before
7. CV and job details to hand
8. Finally - Have some questions ready and don't forget to smile


If you need any more advice, please get in touch with one of the team today:

Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk

Read More »

Monday, 23 March 2020

Open for Business



Like everyone I’ve been doing a lot of thinking so I thought I’d share some of my learning and experiences that have helped me make it through the last few weeks.


One day at a time

I’m just taking each day as it comes to stop myself feeling overwhelmed! I’ve been leaving space in my diary for the unexpected, events are changing daily and I need to have the capacity to react when necessary. I’m prioritising activities I can control and accept those that I can’t. This is really helping to lift my energy and mood and give me some sense of accomplishment on a daily basis.
We need to see people, face to face
The importance of face to face communication with my team even though we are remote is really showing. I’ve been scheduling regular video meetings to update and keep track of goals and individual personal situations. We are all fighting our own battles and it is helpful to share so we can support and advise each other as a team. These video meetings might even be a habit I keep up when social distancing is lifted!


Thinking of a victorious outcome

Overall, I’m visualising coming out of the other side of this – with continual reminders to myself that it is temporary. I’m convinced this experience will show us how resilient we are as a team and how much stronger our business will be as a result. We are celebrating each milestone and victory, however small.  I think if we create positive energies this encourages us to keep persisting and moving forward with confidence that good things can still happen.
I think the virus is an opportunity for the world to refocus on what matters. We are so busy we forget to appreciate what really gives our lives meaning. The people in our lives – family, colleagues, friends, neighbours and loved ones cannot be replaced.


Helping others makes you feel great 

I’m trying to make time to offer to help others in this crisis – asking where I can personally help a client which has been welcomed so far. I’ve set up a free CV Clinic to help Reading based hospitality staff promote their transferable skills into different sectors. These people need all the help they can get right now. You can get in touch via cvclinic@louisafleet.co.uk
Making a positive contribution and assisting others in the business community helps me feel like I’ve accomplished something.
Compassion is so important at this time – that may mean offering to help that man screaming in the toilet roll aisle rather than shouting at him. Like I said earlier, we are all fighting our own battles.


You can’t beat a bit of fresh air and gratitude 

It’s easy to neglect yourself in these situations but there is no sick pay when you run your own business and no basic salary to fall back on if the business grinds to a halt so I’ve been really paying attention to healthy eating, exercise, and sleep.
Getting out in the fresh air is really important for me and thankfully our wonderful office dog Billy makes sure I take him out twice a day!
I highly recommend a daily gratitude journal. It's a bit like counting your blessings morning and evening and it really lifts my spirits. I reflect on things that I am grateful for; things that make me smile; people who I am thankful for, something that made me laugh. There is always good in every day and it’s great to reflect and record this.


Open for business

Seeing our clients push on with hiring as usual where possible gives us hope for some business continuity and we are doing the same. It’s not surprising that companies involved in on-line supply and the domestic and health services sector are reporting a hike in recruitment requirements. They’ve got increasing demands that they can’t cope with. Our clients are looking to the future and are conscious of needing to maintain capacity for when the crisis is over. They are planning their recruitment carefully and nearby start dates are still going ahead. We are all adapting to the government advice and behaving responsibly around social distancing. Telephone and video interviews are the perfect solution for hiring managers who are adapting their processes so they can still move quickly to secure their ideal candidates. (I wrote a blog post about video interviews here)
So, in summary, we are standing strong, open for business and ready to serve!

If you are recruiting or looking for a job please do get in touch sales@louisafleet.co.uk

Like everyone I’ve been doing a lot of thinking so I thought I’d share some of my learning and experiences that have helped me make it through the last few weeks.


One day at a time

I’m just taking each day as it comes to stop myself feeling overwhelmed! I’ve been leaving space in my diary for the unexpected, events are changing daily and I need to have the capacity to react when necessary. I’m prioritising activities I can control and accept those that I can’t. This is really helping to lift my energy and mood and give me some sense of accomplishment on a daily basis.
We need to see people, face to face
The importance of face to face communication with my team even though we are remote is really showing. I’ve been scheduling regular video meetings to update and keep track of goals and individual personal situations. We are all fighting our own battles and it is helpful to share so we can support and advise each other as a team. These video meetings might even be a habit I keep up when social distancing is lifted!


Thinking of a victorious outcome

Overall, I’m visualising coming out of the other side of this – with continual reminders to myself that it is temporary. I’m convinced this experience will show us how resilient we are as a team and how much stronger our business will be as a result. We are celebrating each milestone and victory, however small.  I think if we create positive energies this encourages us to keep persisting and moving forward with confidence that good things can still happen.
I think the virus is an opportunity for the world to refocus on what matters. We are so busy we forget to appreciate what really gives our lives meaning. The people in our lives – family, colleagues, friends, neighbours and loved ones cannot be replaced.


Helping others makes you feel great 

I’m trying to make time to offer to help others in this crisis – asking where I can personally help a client which has been welcomed so far. I’ve set up a free CV Clinic to help Reading based hospitality staff promote their transferable skills into different sectors. These people need all the help they can get right now. You can get in touch via cvclinic@louisafleet.co.uk
Making a positive contribution and assisting others in the business community helps me feel like I’ve accomplished something.
Compassion is so important at this time – that may mean offering to help that man screaming in the toilet roll aisle rather than shouting at him. Like I said earlier, we are all fighting our own battles.


You can’t beat a bit of fresh air and gratitude 

It’s easy to neglect yourself in these situations but there is no sick pay when you run your own business and no basic salary to fall back on if the business grinds to a halt so I’ve been really paying attention to healthy eating, exercise, and sleep.
Getting out in the fresh air is really important for me and thankfully our wonderful office dog Billy makes sure I take him out twice a day!
I highly recommend a daily gratitude journal. It's a bit like counting your blessings morning and evening and it really lifts my spirits. I reflect on things that I am grateful for; things that make me smile; people who I am thankful for, something that made me laugh. There is always good in every day and it’s great to reflect and record this.


Open for business

Seeing our clients push on with hiring as usual where possible gives us hope for some business continuity and we are doing the same. It’s not surprising that companies involved in on-line supply and the domestic and health services sector are reporting a hike in recruitment requirements. They’ve got increasing demands that they can’t cope with. Our clients are looking to the future and are conscious of needing to maintain capacity for when the crisis is over. They are planning their recruitment carefully and nearby start dates are still going ahead. We are all adapting to the government advice and behaving responsibly around social distancing. Telephone and video interviews are the perfect solution for hiring managers who are adapting their processes so they can still move quickly to secure their ideal candidates. (I wrote a blog post about video interviews here)
So, in summary, we are standing strong, open for business and ready to serve!

If you are recruiting or looking for a job please do get in touch sales@louisafleet.co.uk
Read More »

Wednesday, 18 March 2020

Video Interviewing





1. What questions are asked in a video interview?


Like in all kinds of interviews, questions are relevant to the job, the function and the seniority level. They also have to do with the hiring stage. For example, first-round interviews usually cover basic topics such as availability and salary expectations, while interviews at later stages might address career goals and projects that candidates will manage if hired.

The same guidelines apply in video interviews. Since it’s common to have a video call early in the hiring process, as a screening method, here are some common video interview questions you can ask:


⦁  What attracted you to sales? Why did you decide to apply for this sales role?
⦁  Tell me about a sale you are most proud of and why?
⦁  What inspired you to pursue this type of sales career?
⦁  Describe briefly a sales objection you faced and how you overcame it.
⦁  What does a good week look like to you, sales activity wise?
⦁  What do you want from your next employer and line manager, tell me your “must haves” and “nice to haves”?

For more video interview tips, have a look at these online interview questions and Skype interview questions. Here are also some sample video interview questions and answers specifically for remote employees.

2. How do I prepare myself for a video interview?


Besides having the proper video equipment (camera, mic, software, etc.), interviewers need to ensure that video calls go as smoothly as possible. Here are some tips to prepare yourself before a video interview with candidates:

For live video interviews:

⦁  Be ready 20 minutes before each call to test your equipment.  We recommend Zoom or Skype (https://zoom.us/ https://www.skype.com/en/) Even if you’ve used them before, unexpected issues could arise at any moment. It’s useful to have the candidate’s contact details handy in case you need to inform them about a delay
⦁  Make sure they have clear instructions on how to receive the call their end.
⦁  Pick a room that’s free of distractions. Good lighting, privacy and a de-cluttered background are also essential. Make sure to mute any notifications you have on your computer (e.g. email, Slack) so that you stay focused on your interview.
⦁  Keep in mind that video interviews can be stressful for candidates considering they’re basically talking to a screen. Help them feel more comfortable by maintaining eye contact and showing that they have your full attention. For example, if you’re making video calls with your phone, it might seem you’re in a rush. Plus, the fact that when you’re holding your phone, the screen is not stable and could distract candidates.

3. What are some disadvantages of video interviews – and what can I do about them?


While video interviews can benefit your hiring process, you should also consider the following potential risks:

Poor evaluation due to technical difficulties

No matter how well-prepared you and the candidate are, something could always go wrong (e.g. poor connection or a temporary malfunction of the camera.) These technical issues can hinder the flow of conversation and may be stressful for candidates.
Tip: if you face technical difficulties during an interview, don’t be too harsh on candidates. Also, consider having a quick follow-up if you didn’t have the chance to discuss everything during your call.


Personality bias
While video interviews help you structure your hiring process, and therefore be more objective, they can also introduce new biases. Think of how interviewers can be influenced by a nice-sounding voice or a confident attitude. These characteristics may be job-related if we’re talking about a sales role or customer-facing position, but they could subconsciously (and wrongfully) be used as criteria for other roles, too.

Source- resources.workable.com



Get in touch with one of the team today:


Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk
Social Media: LinkedIn Twitter | Facebook | Instagram |






1. What questions are asked in a video interview?


Like in all kinds of interviews, questions are relevant to the job, the function and the seniority level. They also have to do with the hiring stage. For example, first-round interviews usually cover basic topics such as availability and salary expectations, while interviews at later stages might address career goals and projects that candidates will manage if hired.

The same guidelines apply in video interviews. Since it’s common to have a video call early in the hiring process, as a screening method, here are some common video interview questions you can ask:


⦁  What attracted you to sales? Why did you decide to apply for this sales role?
⦁  Tell me about a sale you are most proud of and why?
⦁  What inspired you to pursue this type of sales career?
⦁  Describe briefly a sales objection you faced and how you overcame it.
⦁  What does a good week look like to you, sales activity wise?
⦁  What do you want from your next employer and line manager, tell me your “must haves” and “nice to haves”?

For more video interview tips, have a look at these online interview questions and Skype interview questions. Here are also some sample video interview questions and answers specifically for remote employees.

2. How do I prepare myself for a video interview?


Besides having the proper video equipment (camera, mic, software, etc.), interviewers need to ensure that video calls go as smoothly as possible. Here are some tips to prepare yourself before a video interview with candidates:

For live video interviews:

⦁  Be ready 20 minutes before each call to test your equipment.  We recommend Zoom or Skype (https://zoom.us/ https://www.skype.com/en/) Even if you’ve used them before, unexpected issues could arise at any moment. It’s useful to have the candidate’s contact details handy in case you need to inform them about a delay
⦁  Make sure they have clear instructions on how to receive the call their end.
⦁  Pick a room that’s free of distractions. Good lighting, privacy and a de-cluttered background are also essential. Make sure to mute any notifications you have on your computer (e.g. email, Slack) so that you stay focused on your interview.
⦁  Keep in mind that video interviews can be stressful for candidates considering they’re basically talking to a screen. Help them feel more comfortable by maintaining eye contact and showing that they have your full attention. For example, if you’re making video calls with your phone, it might seem you’re in a rush. Plus, the fact that when you’re holding your phone, the screen is not stable and could distract candidates.

3. What are some disadvantages of video interviews – and what can I do about them?


While video interviews can benefit your hiring process, you should also consider the following potential risks:

Poor evaluation due to technical difficulties

No matter how well-prepared you and the candidate are, something could always go wrong (e.g. poor connection or a temporary malfunction of the camera.) These technical issues can hinder the flow of conversation and may be stressful for candidates.
Tip: if you face technical difficulties during an interview, don’t be too harsh on candidates. Also, consider having a quick follow-up if you didn’t have the chance to discuss everything during your call.


Personality bias
While video interviews help you structure your hiring process, and therefore be more objective, they can also introduce new biases. Think of how interviewers can be influenced by a nice-sounding voice or a confident attitude. These characteristics may be job-related if we’re talking about a sales role or customer-facing position, but they could subconsciously (and wrongfully) be used as criteria for other roles, too.

Source- resources.workable.com



Get in touch with one of the team today:


Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk
Social Media: LinkedIn Twitter | Facebook | Instagram |


Read More »

Tuesday, 10 March 2020

5 Reasons to be Socially Responsible




The idea of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is not new – the idea that companies should give back to their communities started in the Victorian era with companies like Cadbury keen to demonstrate their social worth as well as their ability to make profits. But why should you take on this responsibility?

Here are 5 good reasons …


Gain credibility as an employer

The ideas slowly gained credibility through the 1990s until they gained renewed prominence with examples of corporate scandals such as ENRON, the financial crash and growing awareness of impending ecological crisis bringing the behaviour of companies into the limelight. So don’t be shy about doing the right thing – it’s an important way of demonstrating you care about the long term consequences of what you do and are invested in the community you are a part of.


Showcase your values

An article in the Harvard Business Review describes CSR as a way to ‘align a company’s social and environmental activities with its business purpose and values’.  We think this is a great way of looking at it. How you approach CSR has to fit your company – each business will face different challenges depending on the industry you are in, the size of your company and the kind of product or service you provide. Values are important to prospective employees who demonstrate integrity and commitment – they want to be part of a venture that behaves ethically.


Increase your profits

There are also different approaches you can take to your CSR – companies we work with tend to combine different elements that work best for their company and community.  Sustainable and ecological initiatives should be high up on your list – we get many candidates who tell us they only want to work for companies that take their environmental responsibilities seriously. You may also find that initiatives to reduce your use of resources, cut waste, etc. will also have a beneficial effect on your profits – which is never a bad thing!  Not only that, a profitable business is attractive to new hires as it helps them feel secure about their future – if you change companies you don’t want to join a sinking ship!


It’s a USP your sales force can promote

Philanthropy can be a way to do more than giving money or raising cash through sponsorships – doing a clean-up in a local park can be a great team-building exercise for your staff and also help their wellbeing.  Ask your team for any ideas they would like to put forward. This can make for great PR if you spread the word on your social media! It can also make a nice conversational topic for sales reps targeting that business community.
As a side benefit, it has been proved that companies working hard at their CSR often find that productivity increases alongside their reputation. This can then translate into increased customer loyalty and trust – this is great news for sales teams! Sales people love to have something unique to say about the company they are selling, it really helps them with their pitch – and helps them believe in what they are selling.


Reduce your annual quit rate and attract great candidates

Research has also discovered that the best companies for CSR also managed to reduce their annual quit rate by 3% - which amounted to a 25-30% reduction compared to companies without active CSR measures. That’s a great benefit to the bottom line!  Not only that but having a reputation for great CSR helps to attract more applicants – we’ve seen this ourselves.


Get in touch with one of the team today:

Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk







The idea of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is not new – the idea that companies should give back to their communities started in the Victorian era with companies like Cadbury keen to demonstrate their social worth as well as their ability to make profits. But why should you take on this responsibility?

Here are 5 good reasons …


Gain credibility as an employer

The ideas slowly gained credibility through the 1990s until they gained renewed prominence with examples of corporate scandals such as ENRON, the financial crash and growing awareness of impending ecological crisis bringing the behaviour of companies into the limelight. So don’t be shy about doing the right thing – it’s an important way of demonstrating you care about the long term consequences of what you do and are invested in the community you are a part of.


Showcase your values

An article in the Harvard Business Review describes CSR as a way to ‘align a company’s social and environmental activities with its business purpose and values’.  We think this is a great way of looking at it. How you approach CSR has to fit your company – each business will face different challenges depending on the industry you are in, the size of your company and the kind of product or service you provide. Values are important to prospective employees who demonstrate integrity and commitment – they want to be part of a venture that behaves ethically.


Increase your profits

There are also different approaches you can take to your CSR – companies we work with tend to combine different elements that work best for their company and community.  Sustainable and ecological initiatives should be high up on your list – we get many candidates who tell us they only want to work for companies that take their environmental responsibilities seriously. You may also find that initiatives to reduce your use of resources, cut waste, etc. will also have a beneficial effect on your profits – which is never a bad thing!  Not only that, a profitable business is attractive to new hires as it helps them feel secure about their future – if you change companies you don’t want to join a sinking ship!


It’s a USP your sales force can promote

Philanthropy can be a way to do more than giving money or raising cash through sponsorships – doing a clean-up in a local park can be a great team-building exercise for your staff and also help their wellbeing.  Ask your team for any ideas they would like to put forward. This can make for great PR if you spread the word on your social media! It can also make a nice conversational topic for sales reps targeting that business community.
As a side benefit, it has been proved that companies working hard at their CSR often find that productivity increases alongside their reputation. This can then translate into increased customer loyalty and trust – this is great news for sales teams! Sales people love to have something unique to say about the company they are selling, it really helps them with their pitch – and helps them believe in what they are selling.


Reduce your annual quit rate and attract great candidates

Research has also discovered that the best companies for CSR also managed to reduce their annual quit rate by 3% - which amounted to a 25-30% reduction compared to companies without active CSR measures. That’s a great benefit to the bottom line!  Not only that but having a reputation for great CSR helps to attract more applicants – we’ve seen this ourselves.


Get in touch with one of the team today:

Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk




Read More »

Thursday, 27 February 2020

7 Reasons why it's your fault your new hire takes so long to learn




Ever wondered why your new staff  “just don’t get it?"

Ever heard yourself saying that “these new hires just don’t seem to have the initiative, they don’t listen to simple instructions” and they “don’t follow the advice that’s been given”
“It’s not rocket science! It’s all there written down. We have a process for everything!”

Consider these harsh facts that probably apply to your business.

Only your really experienced staff actually know every step in your business process
(Stan who started in the warehouse when he was 18, has been promoted many times and now is the service manager) “There is nothing Stan doesn’t know about your business”

Every depot in the UK (there are 10) relies upon their equivalent, Stan ...
1. All the “Stan's” in the business are close to retirement
2. You rely on all the “Stan's” and his subordinates to show your new starters your business processes and then they are expected to be able to “just get on with it”
3. You think you have a great written process but it has gaping holes in it that make it impossible for a new person to follow - they have to “go and ask Stan”
4. Your process isn’t a process, it’s a checklist - vague bullet points put together by Stan
5. When a relevant question is asked, the answer is…
“Oh yes, good point, it doesn’t detail it in the process document but “ask Stan - he knows”
6. Your process is full of company jargon which needs extra explanation unless you are “Stan” or a “Stan equivalent”
7. Even all the Stan equivalents follow different processes and use different terminology for the same activity

If this sounds like your business then how can you blame your staff for “not getting it”.

Perhaps it’s about time you took a long hard look at your business processes.
Save yourself time, money and hassle by creating a uniform process that is easy to understand for new starters, long term staff and get everyone on the same page.

I did the first step of this with the business process experts Libreea.
It turns out my 10-step process to the untrained eye was actually 58 steps.
How on earth should I expect a new hire to “get” those missing 48 steps?.

Don’t blame your new starters, or the recruiters or the hiring managers for making a wrong decision.
Take a look at your processes and save yourself time and money on turning over the staff that “just don’t get it”

If these sound-like familiar issues to you and for your business Libreea are experts in business processes and will provide advice and guidance on all business processes - visit www.libreea.co.uk Or If you’d like a personal introduction to this dedicated team of experts please just let me know.

Get in touch with one of the team today:

Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk





Ever wondered why your new staff  “just don’t get it?"

Ever heard yourself saying that “these new hires just don’t seem to have the initiative, they don’t listen to simple instructions” and they “don’t follow the advice that’s been given”
“It’s not rocket science! It’s all there written down. We have a process for everything!”

Consider these harsh facts that probably apply to your business.

Only your really experienced staff actually know every step in your business process
(Stan who started in the warehouse when he was 18, has been promoted many times and now is the service manager) “There is nothing Stan doesn’t know about your business”

Every depot in the UK (there are 10) relies upon their equivalent, Stan ...
1. All the “Stan's” in the business are close to retirement
2. You rely on all the “Stan's” and his subordinates to show your new starters your business processes and then they are expected to be able to “just get on with it”
3. You think you have a great written process but it has gaping holes in it that make it impossible for a new person to follow - they have to “go and ask Stan”
4. Your process isn’t a process, it’s a checklist - vague bullet points put together by Stan
5. When a relevant question is asked, the answer is…
“Oh yes, good point, it doesn’t detail it in the process document but “ask Stan - he knows”
6. Your process is full of company jargon which needs extra explanation unless you are “Stan” or a “Stan equivalent”
7. Even all the Stan equivalents follow different processes and use different terminology for the same activity

If this sounds like your business then how can you blame your staff for “not getting it”.

Perhaps it’s about time you took a long hard look at your business processes.
Save yourself time, money and hassle by creating a uniform process that is easy to understand for new starters, long term staff and get everyone on the same page.

I did the first step of this with the business process experts Libreea.
It turns out my 10-step process to the untrained eye was actually 58 steps.
How on earth should I expect a new hire to “get” those missing 48 steps?.

Don’t blame your new starters, or the recruiters or the hiring managers for making a wrong decision.
Take a look at your processes and save yourself time and money on turning over the staff that “just don’t get it”

If these sound-like familiar issues to you and for your business Libreea are experts in business processes and will provide advice and guidance on all business processes - visit www.libreea.co.uk Or If you’d like a personal introduction to this dedicated team of experts please just let me know.

Get in touch with one of the team today:

Email: info@louisafleet.co.uk


Read More »